What Is Context Influence Social Behavior?

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As described by DiMaggio & Powell (1983) along with Meyer & Rowan (1977) institutional theory describes the underlining social structure of society and how it is incorporated and influences organisational structures through social behaviour as a way of survival. This theory can be observed through the rationalisation of myths into organisational structures by the integration of ceremonial positions and actions that contrarily have no effect or reduce the operational efficiency of a company (Meyer & Rowan, 1977). Throughout this overview make note that context is important in any analysis of theory to the real world as some definitions can be globally different depending on geographical location, culture, and point in history (Campbell, 2007, …show more content…
They also all tend to be the same and are to follow the same way of operating vs. adjusting for efficiency. Managers and stakeholders that have rationalized the benefits of institutionalized conformity (like being socially responsible) on a personal and professional level they embody those values with actions in their day-to-day operations thinking it’s financially positive (Campbell, 2007, p. 949). In particular, it can be seen more clearly from the stakeholders by pressuring the firms to behave in socially responsible ways (Campbell, 2007, p. 949). This leads way to two types of influences of change, usually from a legislative perspective; incentives and restrictions (Campbell, 2007). Like the role of enactment from the organisations control, the government and societal side lays out the different types of laws and regulations to legislate organisational change to conform to, whether it’s accepted or …show more content…
Innovation is an example of this, in which, by resisting and being successful ends up redefining conformity. Where other environmental factors for conformity are more appealing for one organisation, but become the opposite for another, resistance strategies are more effective (Oliver, 1991, p. 174). When considering the influence of institutional pressures on actors, more precisely, in this instance, managers, most analysis of conformity and resistance excludes the influence of the state of the economy of an organisation when it comes to strategic responses (Campbell, 2007, p. 953). When this is taken into consideration, we see a range upon which companies financially sit from feeling threatened to secure (Campbell, 2007, p. 953). Organisations in the middle range of this scale tend to feel secure in their survival but still conform (to be socially responsible) enough to continue their survival (Campbell, 2007, p. 953). On the two extreme ends when a company feels their survival is financially threatened, they will not meet the minimum corporate social responsibility because it would be too costly for their survival (Campbell, 2007, p. 953). Here in this example can be seen by companies dumping waste into the environment as a substitute to properly dispose of it (Campbell, 2007, p. 953). When it comes to a company feeling very secure, they will tend to act in a comparable way in the

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