Gender Inequality Definition

1143 Words 5 Pages
Williams and Lawson (1998) suggested patterns of social behavior are influenced by parents, schools and other institutions. Taking this concept to look at gender inequality, it may be indeed true. Upbringing is one of the first forms of education children receives, parents act as role models of the children. They play a huge role in influencing of social behaviors, and in this context, on gender inequality. Parents can influence their children from the way they divide their roles between family and work, also in the way they interact with each other, and with their children. Though, less obvious in modern times, males are still considered as the breadwinner of the family, whilst females are still considered as the more acceptable gender …show more content…
According to Payscale’s study (2017), women in USA earn around 4% than their male counterparts annually. And according to a survey conducted by LeanIn.Org and McKinsey & Co (2017), females account for only 19% of workers, who are able to advance to C-suite positions. Concluding from the results, women are underpaid compared to men, and it is more difficult for them to advance to higher positions. This has not only created an unfriendly working atmosphere for female workers, but may also influence people to think that women are less capable than men. The judgements are very much based on their gender and the characteristics their gender is associated with, such as being overly …show more content…
The influences can be observed in gender inequality, or the gender roles imposed on both men and women. Men are considered biologically stronger than most women. It has been more favorable for them in the past, when the economy has been dominated by primary industries, such as hunting and fishery, which required stamina and strength. Men are perceived as more dominant, rational and rule conscious according to their gender, it has worked in their advantage, allowing to advance up the career ladder easier, and occupying more important roles in workplace. However, male’s ‘advantageous’ biology and genetics have imposed on them the role of ‘breadwinner’. Men’s success is hugely determined by their status in the society and the position they occupy at work, they are expected to earn more money and provide for their family. Thus, it has probably contributed to the toxic expectation on men, forcing them to choose work over family. When men decide to be the caregiver or the stay-at-home parent in the family, they are associated to be less capable and looked down

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