African American Inequality Analysis

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Without blatantly stating it, society has found a way to ensure the legal separation of the African Americans from the whites. White people (mostly, of course) aren’t going to deliberately say, “We want to live in a segregated lifestyle; the whites to one side and the African Americans to the other.” They are, however, going to do anything in their power to make this happen without actually coming out and saying it because that would be rude and politically incorrect. David Roediger states that “[b]etween 1890 and 1915, in the face of racial tensions heightened by disturbing evidence of black independence and assertiveness, whites acted to ensure the permanent political, economic, and social subordination and powerless of the black population” …show more content…
A great foundation for the issue of inequality is seen in the documentary Race: The Power of an Illusion. In the segment “The House We Live In,” it discusses how communities all along the east coast, Levittown, Pennsylvania in particular, were created with hopes of having families of middle- to upper-middle class from military backgrounds to move in after World War II (Race: The Power of an Illusion 2003). This town, and many others just like it, is known as sundown towns. James W. Loewen explains that sundown towns are “organized jusrisdiction[s] that for decades kept African Americans or other groups from living in it and was thus ‘all-white’ on purpose” (Loewen 2005, 4). Many of these towns were beginning to be located more and more in the suburbs, outside the main cities. When many African American veterans came back from World War II, they had hopes of establishing their homes and starting their families. Many turned to Levitttown in search for affordable homes; what occurred, however, were many of the relators of these homes denying the African Americans ability to move in for the color of their skin. Some would tell the African Americans that these homes were not available for African Americans to own. Instead they were forced to live in public housing centered closer to the …show more content…
Brown was seen as a massive step to eradicated segregation one small step at a time. Gilbert Jones writes that “[…] it waws that in the 1930s, the legal arm of the National Associated for the Advancement of Colored People began plotting a litigation strategy to force the courts to confront the evils of racism. […] From Brown v. Board flowed a robust civil rights movement and, in time, a giant wave of equal rights legislation that even a Congress disproportionately influenced by old-guard Southerners could not resist” (Jones 2005, 31). Although legally, segregation on the basis of color is not allowed, it is still prevalent all throughout the country. In the podcast “The Problem We All Live With,” the parents of the mostly white schools were so worried when they learned that the non-accredited school would merge into their school. They all believed they would cause the school to decrease in worth and would make the school ghetto and violent (This American Life 2015). The principle of housing blockbusting also can apply in the education system; the African Americans integrating into these predominately white schools don’t cause the school to become bad, but the whites leaving do. In fact, it has been shown that African Americans

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