Inequality In African American Women

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For years women struggled with inequality. Women were thought to be inferior and much less than men, even less than a fully human. A lot like African American’s, women had little to no independence. They were forced to rely on their husbands and male family members for everything. Women were even encouraged to marry in order to ensure economic security. Women were simply less than men. As if it wasn’t hard enough to be a white woman earlier then the 1900s, African American women were discriminated against for not only being women, but for also being a different race. African American women were appointed with double the difficulties of having and expressing any rights or opinions. Women were unable to hold opinions on anything, but especially …show more content…
One in particular have been the Seneca Falls convention which was arguably the beginning of the journey towards women’s equal rights. On July 19th, 1848 in Seneca Falls, New York almost 200 women attended a conference organized by Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton to “discuss the social, civil, and religious condition and rights of women.” (History) At this conference the “Declaration of Sentiments” was created. This was a revision of the Declaration of Independence that included women to it. In 1869 Lucy Stone and Henry Blackwell formed the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA) and Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony formed the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA) which pushed for an amendment making it legal for women to vote. In 1890 the NWSA and the AWSA merged creating the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) who worked to bring women the right to vote in individual states instead of through the federal government like they had in the …show more content…
The establishment of associations, the holding of conventions and conferences, and these territories granting women rights led to the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment: Women’s right to vote. On June 4th, 1919 the 19th Amendment was passed by Congress. On August 18th, 1920 the 19th Amendment of the Constitution was ratified stating, “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” (Archives) and women were officially granted the right to vote.
Getting to this point was a huge struggle but the women’s rights activists stood behind it and never gave up. Beginning in the 1800s, women organized, petitioned, and picketed to win the right to vote, but it took decades for them to achieve their overall goal. Along with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony, Lucy Stone, and Henry Blackwell in the fight for women’s rights were Jane Addams who was the president of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, Carrie Chapman Catt who was the president of NAWSA, William Lloyd Garrison, Sojourner Truth, and Frederick

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