Inequality: Equal And The Oppression Of Human Society

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inequality issues. We are so wrapped up in our own lives that we “think about human society with calm and disinterested eyes” but if we look closely, its easy to see “only the violence of powerful men and the oppression of the weak” (Rousseau, 10). Is what is happening today with police brutality but a window into our systemic oppression and violence against those who have the least power to do anything about it? Our duty as “revolted mind[s]” at seeing such a truth is that we must “deplore the blindness of the others” and work toward making the world an equal and thus free place for all (Rousseau, 10). In the end, Rousseau says, “ since nothing is less stable among men than these external relationships, which chance produces more often …show more content…
He says, the more we think about inequality, “the greater the distance from pure sense esperience to the simplest knowledge grows before our eyes” making it very difficult to distinguish the trith for most people (Rousseau, 18). He uses something as simple as fire to illustrate his point. He asks, “how many centuries might perhaps have passed before men were inclined to see some fire other than the fire in the sky? How many different risks did they have to face to learn the most common uses of that element? How many times did they let it go out, before having acquired the art of reproducing it?” (Rousseau, 18). Nevertheless, even through the difficulties and all the time it might take, he is confident that humanity will see the …show more content…
He compares the rampant constructions guiding and playing games with people’s lives. He says, “modern bourgeois society with its relations of roduction, of exchange and of preperty, a society that has conjured up such gigantic means of production and of exchage, is like a sorcerer, who is no longer able to control the powers of the nether world whom he has called up by his spells” (Marx, 17). To fix this broken system of socially contructed gears grinding on each other, Marx’s solution “abolishes eternal truths, it abolishes all religion, and all morality, intead of constituting them on a new basis; it therefore acts in contradiction to all past historical experience" . . . which would only be possible with “the total disappearance of class antagonisms” (Marx, 26). Though the old feudal system was dismantled long before Marx, capitalism brought about the semblance of freedom while still enslaving the masses. He says, “we see then: the means of production and of exchange, on whose foundation the bourgeoisie built itself up, were generated in feudal society” (Marx, 17). Marx sees the chains that Rousseau was talking about but he speaks on the subject more specifically, illuminating on how the social constructs create the inequality, the removal of which would create a freer more equal world without

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