Agriculture Vs Industrialized Agriculture

Superior Essays
For most of mankind, humans followed an agrarian lifestyle as a means to live. This lifestyle has shifted in recent years as societies turned towards industry. Following the Industrial Revolution, lifestyles were dramatically altered and encouraged people to leave their farmsteads to move into the city. At the same time, birth rates dramatically increased, creating a greater urgency for food security. Farmers managed to increase food production with the development of technology as well as scientific innovation. Industrialized agriculture was developed as a solution for securing food security and ending world hunger.
Industrialized agriculture first began with the improvement of farm tools. The development of machinery such as the steel plow
…show more content…
The industry quickly grew to meet the needs of the population to the point that its growth remained unhindered. Farmers soon found themselves growing too much food, resulting in an unstable market. “To discourage the resulting surplus, the government instituted the Agricultural Adjustment Act of May 1933, which paid farmers not to produce specific abundant crops or livestock, such as wheat, corn, hogs, and dairy products,” (Kline 2011, p. 75). Here we have a situation where is there is enough food to feed the people, but instead farmers are being told to withhold their production. While this practice helped protect farmers, it did little for consumers who were currently experiencing the Great Depression. Nowadays, the U.S does the opposite, subsidizing farmer’s surplus to maintain steady market value. “...the Environmental Working Group released an analysis that showed correlation between areas where farmers have been enjoying rising farm subsidies and growing poverty, and a Walmart in Ohio is holding a food drive in its store… for its own employees!” (Leonard 2014, P. 67). Current supplies outweigh demands, yet farms continue to expand unfettered. In a normal situation, a farm would be forced to downsize or go out of business. Instead, taxpayers bail out farmers while requiring assistance for their own livelihoods. The practice of government subsidies is controversial as it protects the …show more content…
“According to the United Nations (UN) Food and Agriculture Organization, worldwide consumption of meat has increased from 23 kilograms to 42 kilograms per-capita between 1961 and 2009.” (Stoll-Kleemann 2015, p. 2). American diets have changed dramatically in recent years with increases of corn, meat and dairy in their diets. The government promotes the consumption of these surplus foods, lowering their costs and making them easily available. Thanks to the subsidies, the products produced from industrial farms are cheaper than foods produced by other means. The trend of over consumption reflects itself in American culture with large serving sizes and excess caloric

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    1. The neolithic revolution was the period in time in which the introduction of agriculture led people to transition from the wandering nomadic lifestyle to settled life. During this time, nomads, or people who wandered from place to place in search of food, began to domesticate animals and crops so that they no longer had to follow or hunt for their food sources; because of this, these former nomads were able to create farms using the crops they domesticated and settlements and were able to use their domesticated animals, not only as a source of food, but also as a source of companionship, a tool to assist with farm labor, and for transportation. The development of farming spread to other areas of society as well, as the creation of new tools for farming, new types of shelter, and clothing among other things began to emerge. As time went on, the techniques and tools used for farming were improved and new tools to assist in the storing, sowing, planting of seeds, and measuring of time were created; these innovations caused farms to create surpluses of food, which lead to the growth of population and the…

    • 402 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Michael Pollan's piece “Big Food Strikes Back” in October 9, 2016 The New York Times Magazine begins with critique of a lack of the discussion about food system during 2008 U.S. presidential campaigns. Nevertheless, the food topic—being multi-dimensional—is inevitably a part of a larger, and more discussed, themes such as public health, climate change, and nation's' energy requirements, to name a few. Furthermore, the author in this article pinpoints the U.S. food systems' problems. The production of monocrops, which are subsidized by the government, result in high emissivity of the greenhouse gasses and have shown a negative impact on public health and ecology.…

    • 497 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Individuals will consume as much food as they feel in order to satisfy their needs if it tastes good. People don’t know when to stop eating simply because they get caught up in how good something tastes. Michael Pollan explains the importance of the Western diet and why it is essential to escape from it in a famous piece, “Escape from the Western Diet”. The food we buy and put in our mouths is full of many different antibiotics and hormones. But, people don’t even know the truth behind what there consuming.…

    • 800 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Analysis of “America’s Food Crisis” The article “America’s Food Crisis” by Bryan Walsh is a mind stimulating read on Walsh’s examination of food production. No one really looks into the depths of food production as they should. In this article Walsh attempts to bring out the negatives on food production by stating facts on how it has affected us financially and health wise. Swift states that we should make smarter food choices instead of going by more are better.…

    • 539 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    As society and civilization have evolved, so has the human diet. Due to some revolutionary events that have occurred in human history, like Agriculture Revolution that ended the Stone Age and the Bronze Age which marked the end of Neolithic period, human diet was effected by changes in extraction and distribution of resources. One of the main periods that recorded the radical change was the Industrial Revolution. The progress in technology through many inventions that happened during this period helped the food industry both directly and indirectly. Throughout history humans have been searching to find better, safer and taster food.…

    • 247 Words
    • 1 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Over the course of time, Americans were getting fatter and vulnerable to more diseases. Americans eating habits changed. They chose meats and fatty foods, instead of food that contain nutrients, minerals, and vitamins we needed. While America grew, so did the people living there. Fast-Foods were growing nationwide and were cheaper, quicker, and easier to buy.…

    • 909 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    1865 To 1900 Dbq

    • 605 Words
    • 3 Pages

    APUSH 1865-1900 Essay The period of time between 1865 and 1900 was one of great technological advancement; and, as a result, great agricultural advancement. As railroads were built throughout the country, transport for crops and livestock was able to be done with more ease and convenience. Innovations in farming equipment allowed for healthier crops and livestock, as well As new tools were invented, and old ones were innovated, the harvest of crops and maintenance of livestock became more efficient. With these advances came a spike in the profitability of agriculture.…

    • 605 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In The Consumer A Republic of Fat, Michael Pollan talks about how today’s addiction to corn syrup is comparable to the national drinking binge of the nineteenth century. Despite the fact he did not connect the two topics as well as he could have, Pollan did a great job of expressing his opinions and giving a factual and emotional appeal to his audience. He gave an emotional appeal by using present day problems that affect Americans, and a factual appeal by using real events that have happened. The excerpt is really eye-opening about how unhealthy the habits of the majority of the American people are.…

    • 653 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Agriculture is one of the main cornerstones of American history, from the Native Americans, to the tobacco fields of Jamestown, to our modern day lives. The United States agriculture system has gone through many changes, but few have been as important as the introduction of the Agricultural Adjustment Act of the New Deal and the later reversal of the act that came in the 1970s under the hand of Earl Butz, which remains in place today. The Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA) was put in place in 1933 to “rescue farmers from the disastrous effects of growing too much food” (Ganzel, Pollan 49). Butz’s plan, on the other hand, reversed the AAA and worked to drive down prices and increase the output of farmers (Pollan 52). The policies had both advantages and disadvantages, but it seemed as if everyone one benefited, more or less, from both.…

    • 793 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Electoral Vote Dbq

    • 389 Words
    • 2 Pages

    An example would be rural farmers who get subsidies that many people think are…

    • 389 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    In this essay, I will consider the topic of vegetarianism from the perspective of environmental concerns that are often associated with the production of meat. In the article, Vegetarianism and Planetary health (2000), Michael Allen Fox states that strict vegetarianism ought to be adopted in order to avoid the eco-destructive nature of the livestock industry. Although there may be some truth to Fox’s initial premise which claims that eating meat is harmful for the environment, I will argue that strict vegetarianism is in fact unnecessary, as it does not exclusively solve the issue of ecological destruction. I will aim to expand on Fox’s claims in order to establish that it is better and more viable to adopt a ‘Demi-Vegetarian’ diet as described…

    • 2037 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    New technologies both advanced farmers with machines such as tractors and but also hurt the farmers as new factories were being opened in urbanized areas with more opportunity of employment and pay. Southern farms were separated into smaller farms and “these yielded less and less of a living, and it said that they will never yield a good living until once more they are integrated into large units” (Hollinger et al., 2011, p. 241). With the growth of factories and the industrial industry, farms would become suburban areas in cities. The decline of agriculture and incline of the urban nation would prove to be a difficult time going well into the Great Depression and beyond.…

    • 668 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Why Australian farmers subsidies should be increased 228 years ago was the beginning of the first successful Australian wheat farm. From then, to now, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics; Australias farm production gross value reached 48.7 billion dollars in worth in 2011. This is exactly how Australia’s agriculture sector continues to remain to be a significant contributor to our economy, in Australia. The 140,704 farms in Australia help provide enough food for 6.4 million souls world wide. Could Australia cope without this?…

    • 654 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    America has made a lot of changes in the past on becoming more inventive, resourceful, and as well as industrialized. Due to the variations in how our food industries operate, small family-owned farms have rapidly vanished leaving us with large, industrialized productions that mass produce for the benefit of the Large Corporations. Americans expect to be able to have large quantities of food available for purchase at anytime and at a low price. Unfortunately in order to get that food to us at low prices, we have to sacrifice aspects of animal rights, human rights, the environment, and health.…

    • 1272 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The events in the books Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury and Brave New World by Aldous Huxley have come to life in society today. Censorship and oppression of society foretold by these books have come true. By using this theme of censorship and oppression from the government, they expressed their vision of what will happen to society. In many ways their writing have came true, from how today’s society innovate lives through technology and constrain society with blanket of false advertising. Ray Bradbury’s and Aldous Huxley’s dystopian novels were not only meant to entice the mind with a well written plot but to open the peoples eyes by seeing through the book at the warning it tells.…

    • 1874 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays

Related Topics