Individuality In Hinduism Essay

1660 Words 7 Pages
Hinduism is a belief that can suit a large variety of people. Based on personality type or choice, a person can select his or her individual path to God through four types of yoga: Bhakti, Jnana, Karma, and Raja. At any point in time when they a parishioner feels as a form of yoga is no longer guiding them to enlightenment, he or she can choose a different yoga of his or her choice in order to further himself or herself on the path to reach Atman. Although Hinduism has a general outline for followers to think and meditate, the religion is generally freeing in the sense that people can personalize his or her journey to God. There are such a variety of paths to take that no two paths can be identical. The concept of individuality in Hinduism …show more content…
Early Thai laws strongly reflected the traditional beliefs of this Asian nation’s predominant religion, Buddhism. Initially, all forms of abortion were illegal and it was not until the middle of the 20th century when the code was revised. Thailand amended these laws to qualify rape, incest, and the potential fatality of the mother as the only exceptions to terminate a pregnancy. In the current era, Thai feminists are campaigning to further amend abortion laws and broaden access to the procedure. Advocates of expanded abortion rights consider abortion a personal matter of individual choice that falls under a woman’s right to control her own body, including reproductive functions. On the contrary, the majority of Buddhists view the existence of the human race as an interconnected system of dependency. The conception of a human life requires two people, and this child’s development and growth requires the efforts of many beyond its immediate family with the goal of raising this infant into a fully functioning member of society. As a result, traditional Buddhists believe the decision to terminate a pregnancy should not solely belong to the mother when her choice affects such an expansive …show more content…
Translated, Mizuko Kuyo means water child memorial service. Occurring three times during the year, the purpose of the ritual comes from the Japanese symbol for water and invokes the god Jizo, the protector of children and travelers through the spiritual and physical realms. Japanese believe that a dead fetus is born within the water of the mother’s womb and, upon death, transfers to its original liquid state under the Earth’s surface. On these holidays, parents tie an infant bib around the neck of a small stone statue of Jizo, placing it in parks located outside of Buddhist temples. These special grounds serve as cheerful spots for families to come and play or appreciate the silence with the memories of their deceased children. The emergence of Mizuko Kuyo occurred simultaneously with rising Buddhist abortion rates. For parents who aborted their child, the ritual serves as a symbol of atonement for deviating from the Eightfold path and for breaking the eternal (peace) law. In reality, Buddhism doesn’t require penance for killing another being, but the ceremony’s popularity is expanding, perhaps providing some sense of relief and eased guilt for those deviating from Buddha’s

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