Individuality In Brave New World By Aldous Huxley

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“Brave New World” by Aldous Huxley is a novel about a society in 632 AF. This society has all of the scientific advancements the 21st century citizens think they need; however, there is no individuality. People are not allowed to make their own decisions or even think for themselves. Every thought, feeling, or action is dictated by the government. Everyone is forced to conform according to how the government deems fit. Huxley demonstrates the importance of individuality and through the characteristics of the citizens in this society . The actions of the citizens of the “Brave New World” are hypnopaedic. The citizens listen to a seemingly never-ending voice saying, “‘everyone belongs to everyone else”’ (40) while sleeping. No one is allowed …show more content…
A child is made in a Fertilizing Room rather than by a mother and father. Huxley explains, “bent over their instruments, three hundred Fertilizers were plunged, as the Director of Hatcheries and Conditioning entered the room…” (4). Countless amounts of money is spent on these instruments only to keep people from developing individual traits. I thought this was completely ludicrous. Even as these children grow up, without a mother or father, they are essentially hypnotized to act as the government deems best for the society. They are taught to love their lives with little to no want for anything more. As they manufacture the children of their future, the Director explains, “‘All conditioning aims at that: making people like their unescapable social destiny’” (16). People in this society don’t even get the opportunity to try to escape whatever predestined life they have. An individual is made by their mistakes from which they learn and grow. Unfortunately, people in this society don’t get the opportunity to try to escape whatever predestined life they have. Not only did I find genetically breeding children unethical and inhumane, but I also found it incredibly selfish. It is true that politics and government isn’t fair; however, I have never heard it to be so relentless as to deprive each individual of love for themselves and their family. Huxley portrays the …show more content…
“‘Euphoric, narcotic, pleasantly hallucinant,”’ as Mustapha Mond describes it. The drug sedates its users and makes them neglect the fact that something may be wrong. This allows the government to deprive its citizens of any knowledge or love they may have. The only love they’re permitted to feel is the love for life. Sounds peaceful right? Unfortunately, it is quite destructive. Today’s drugs allow users take a break from life but never to escape it; unless of course one overdoses and dies. Soma is a never-ending cycle of “harmless” escape from yourself, life, feelings, and society. It is not a helpful stress-relieving drug. Rather it is a controllingly overwhelming drug. "Swallowing half an hour before closing time, that second dose of soma had raised a quite impenetrable wall between the actual universe and their minds" (77) describes Huxley. Soma disables the natural human within the citizens of this society. This, to me, was heart-wrenching. It is so unfortunate to have a government that dispenses a drug purely to deprive you of life’s littlest pleasures. Huxley represents the importance of individualism by showing how lifeless the citizens in his novel are due to

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