Individual Rights In John Locke's Bill Of Rights

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John Locke preached to the readers of Second Treatise on Civil Government “all mankind... being all equal and independent, no one ought to harm another in his life, health, liberty or possessions” to instill a change in how government worked and, a hundred years later, a new country based part of their government off his ideas (John Locke Quotes). America was-and still is-like no other country, thanks to the ideals drafted and signed by the Founding Fathers in the Constitution. The Constitution established the branches of our government, the division of government power, and individual freedoms “given…by nature or God and enshrined in the Constitution’s Bill of Rights” (Sharpio). In the Constitution’s first days, it was missing a very important …show more content…
The most important privileges from the Bill of Rights are freedom of press from the First Amendment, the right of trial by jury in the Sixth Amendment, and no person shall be deprived of life, liberty, or property without due process of law in the Fifth Amendment because these three rights allow …show more content…
One of the most important aspects of this amendment, and in the Constitution, is the right of trial by jury. This is significant to citizens because being judged by peers ensures a fair trial to the defendant and the prosecutor side. It is better to be judged by a group of people that can bring different opinions on the case and then form a decision, than one judge with only one opinion. This aspect has been brought to the attention of the Supreme Court many times. In one case, McKeiver versus Pennsylvania, two juveniles were denied juries in their juvenile court cases. This ruling was brought to the Supreme Court in 1970 to be judged if it broke the Sixth Amendment. The Justices ruled that the entirety of the Sixth Amendment does not apply to juvenile cases because they are not considered either civil or criminal cases. This is a very significant ruling because it reveals the amendment only covers certain cases, and the juvenile court system is not part of that (McKeiver v.

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