Indira Nehru: A Controversial Prime Minister Of India

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Indira Nehru, also known as Indira Gandhi, was one of the most controversial prime ministers of India who led from 1966 to 1980. Gandhi came to power after the death of her father and India’s leader of the Indian National Congress at the time, Jawaharlal Nehru. She started Indian feminism and increased the potential power of women in the world, but she committed many crimes that prove that she was a bad leader for India. She did everything she could to keep herself in power even though she was harming India and taking away rights. Narendra Modi was elected as prime minister of India in 2013, and he has continuously proved himself worthy by improving India’s economy. He “campaigned hard, [portrayed] himself as a pragmatic candidate capable of turning …show more content…
When her father had passed people wondered who was going to take office. Indira’s husband, Feroze Gandhi, Morarji Desai, a finance minister in Nehru’s cabinet, and Indira were all possible candidates to take his place, but there were many complications in all three. Feroze was dying and Moraji was suspected as a spy for the US’ CIA. Indira was still very young and inexperienced which increased the many doubts that were already present because she was a woman. After many possibilities, they finally chose Lal Bhadur Shastri, as he was more favored by India. Although Gandhi was not ruling, she was an active member of Shastri’s cabinet. In 1964, she visited the Soviet Union and made sure that India had their support. In addition, she addressed the outbreaks in Tamil about adopting Hindi. She gained a lot of support because of her Gandhi-like persona. Even when she was hit in the face with a rock by an assailant, she scolded him like a mother and did not get upset. In 1971, she won the elections, at the height of her popularity, in the name of removing poverty (Butler). Gandhi’s influence on India was negative as she did harm the country in trying

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