Sharing Space And Time Analysis

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Having power over our lives and decisions defines the term, sovereignty. Indigenous sovereignty has many barriers, which prevents Indigenous people from having the right to choose their decisions. Trick or Treaty?, a documentary by Alanis Obomsawin, and Sharing Space and Time, a book by Lee Maracle, includes the barriers to their sovereignty. Indigenous people face many problems, and struggles along the way. From the European settlers until now, First Nations experienced genocide, residential schools, a school where Indian children were forced to learn English and Catholicism, and the barriers to their own sovereignty. Treaty Number 9 was mentioned and explained throughout the documentary. This treaty was discussed with the Indigenous people …show more content…
In Sharing Space and Time, Lee Maracle said, “By 1920 school was compulsory,” which shows that the Indigenous people had no choice but to go to school (Maracle 124). This lead to the children forced to leave their family and homes and to school. The residential schools harmed many Indigenous children and their families. They were assimilated into Canadian religion, culture and language. The children’s important traits and beliefs were taken away. The young girls had their hair cut short and uneven, and both girls and boys wore uniform. These children were malnourished, and abused sexually, physically, emotionally, and mentally. The Indigenous language is different from English or French. The young children were forced to learn a new language and communicate with it. The children were prevented from learning their own language, tradition, culture and lifestyle. Establishing this control over the Indigenous people is called colonization. This is a barrier to their own sovereignty. Being able to express their culture through ceremonies and dances is another example of spiritual sovereignty. The Indian Act also created barriers for Indigenous peoples. Potlatches are important ceremonies which distributes wealth among family members and friends. In 1884, potlatches were banned. First Nations were prohibited to perform any ceremonies. However, some Indigenous people …show more content…
In Canada and the United States, villages are separated from another through borders, a pass system, and violently restricting movements which are legal and illegal. This separation “severed, connections to relatives, and continue to impair our economic, trade, cultural, social, ceremonial and political being.” (Maracle 116). Being separated from family and friends ruin many relationships. Indigenous people should be able to communicate with one another easily, but now, it has become more difficult. Indigenous people are more concerned about the land than other Canadians. They think about their relationship with earth and about the privatization on the earth too. Indigenous people respect the land, therefore they think that humans should not privatize parts of the earth. As Lee said, “Yet, to Canada the earth is a vast space, a space to be bought, sold, inherited, exploited, and damaged at will; a space to be tampered with without regard to earth’s own interests or her willingness and ability to sustain us when we violate our agreement with her,” which indicates that Canadians do the exact opposite of the Indigenous people (Maracle 121). Indigenous people do not have the right to control their land. The Indigenous women have a special connection to the earth. Glenda Abbott states that “Indigenous women are taking back their traditional roles as caretakers of the land in

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