Advantages And Disadvantages Of Indigenous Australian Society

Good Essays
Indigenous Australians are significantly disadvantaged in modern Australian society. It exists because white Australian public believe that Australia is a post-racial society and claim to be anti-discrimination while ignoring increased incarceration rates, deaths in custody, and lasting effects from political wrongs committed against indigenous Australians. The sociological imagination is a concept used to see how situations in society occur and play out based on how people differ in terms of their social circumstances (Giddens & Sutton, 2010). Used to ‘think ourselves away’, this concept is a way to distance oneself from subjective influences and see symbolic values in frequently occurring events such as unequal positions between two groups …show more content…
Even now, with the advancements in racial equality, aboriginal belief systems and cultural practices are still viewed as abnormal within society. Many aspects of indigenous religion and belief systems are controlled by non-indigenous Australians, including contemporary images of indigenous persons and their cultural practices (Mikhailovich, Pavil, Ward & McConaghy, 2010). This shows how modern Australian society aims to control indigenous Australians through the distribution of religious information and cultural beliefs exclusive to indigenous Australians. Viewed through the lens of non-indigenous Australians, the public is influenced by incorrect information, pulling them in two general directions: negative and stereotyped views of the indigenous beliefs vs. overly romanticised and sentimental (Mikhailovich, Pavil, Ward & McConaghy, 2010). Religious and cultural beliefs are a sensitive topic in all societies around the globe, the topic in general faces judgment and criticism by those who don’t share the same belief system. However, the challenge for contemporary Australia is “… to support indigenous Australian peoples in their right to self-determination and the right to define and control culture.” (Mikhailovich, Pavil, Ward & McConaghy, 2010). With the manipulation of their own cultural practices, indigenous Australians face social exclusion. This can show itself in various forms of distress, ranging from substance abuse to high rates of domestic abuse and suicide (Humanrights.gov.au,

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    There is simply a lack of multiculturalism from the TV screens in the country of Australia. The Australia TV of news reporting and celebrity casting are dominated by white casts, which can lead to heightened awareness of the fear of sensitive reactions from the public. Hence, more could be done to ensure that there is a fair representation of indigenous people in the media. The media often portray an image and message to its viewers that only the whites can have a say in the society. In Sydney, you could easily find and see so many different cultures and people on the street.…

    • 1940 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    To inspect and scrutinise this settler construct of stereotypes, the aspects of society such as history and education, government and policies, and the media itself will be considered and explored. Stereotypes, as settler constructs of Indigenous Australians, have twisted and distorted how settlers view Aboriginal peoples, and these fashioned perspectives are prevalent throughout Australian history. One of the overarching stereotypes regarding aboriginal peoples is that they are ‘lesser’ than the white man, as seen in this scientific report by a Cambridge university professor, “…evidence points to their lowly status, because of the frequent occurrence of characters very rare to the white races of mankind, but at the same time normal in the ape tribes.” (Duckworth). This scientific racial discrimination was abused frequently to propagandise the settler…

    • 1026 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    (Harris, 1972). For Lincoln and Wilson (1994), police discretionary powers highlight how systematic or institutional racism operates within the criminal justice system, which could easily be used to explain why Indigenous Australians are over-represented. It is not to say that all police officers hold racist views towards Indigenous people, but rather that Indigenous people are often at a disadvantage when it comes to exercising discretionary powers in order to divert them from the criminal justice system (Cunneen and Luke, 1995). This maybe due to the notion that on some subconscious level police feel that Indigenous offenders possess certain characteristics that put them as unsuitable candidates for diversion (Austin, 1997). Similarly, many members of the community may find the behaviour of Indigenous Australians threatening, including the police due to a lack of knowledge about cultural customs and norms (Davis, 1999).…

    • 1204 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The indigenous people are discriminated and not given any attention because of their skin colour and the misconception that was portrayed towards them by the British colonists as criminals and uncivilised. This misconception somehow managed to stay around even after thousands of years. Discrimination such as these causes the potential and the lifestyle of the natives to be supressed and to be buried under these issues causing the downfall of the particular society. But given the chance, a lot of them can make it towards the Australian dream. This makes me wonder, why even in a developed country such as Australia there are still issues such as racism and discrimination occurring?…

    • 1056 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Historically, from the outset Indigenous people were excluded from the Constitution and deemed an inferior race with British colonizers aim to eventually wipe Indigenous people out or have the assimilate into colonised way of life (Rolls 2001, 7). This notion and idea of race as Langton argues is an out-dated ideology, a western idea that helped support colonialism which has been deeply ingrained into Australian society. Theorist, Albert Memmi talks about colonised and the coloniser, furthermore Memmi discusses that successful colonisation of one group over another requires two things being; the oppressed themselves accepting the role in which they have been given and the creation of an oppressor being inherently dominant and controlling in nature. Memmi’s studies coincide with Langton’s argument, drawing upon the UN declaration of the Rights on Indigenous people which directly states, “Affirming doctrines, policies and practises based on advocating superiority of people or individuals based on national origin and or racial or cultural differences are scientifically false and legally invalid” (Langton 2016,…

    • 1170 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    A TNS Social Research study commissioned by Beyond Blue gave credence to the view that discrimination against indigenous Australians is pervasive. There were many misconceptions held by the non-Indigenous Australians interviewed such as the view, by 42 percent of interviewees, that Indigenous Australians are given unfair advantages by the government. Thirty seven percent of those interviewed believed that Indigenous Australians were lazy, 31 percent believed that Aboriginals should do more to assimilate by behaving more like other Australians, and 20 percent believed that racist terms applied to Indigenous Australians were innocuous, therefore inoffensive (Beyond Blue 2014, p. 5). However, on average more than 70 percent of interviewees believed that racism was a significant contributing factor in mental health issues such as depression, anxiety and low self-esteem (Beyond Blue 2014, p. 6). Unemployment is a contributing factor to mental health…

    • 770 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    3.1 Racism in history Racism is “a phenomenon that results in avoidable and unfair inequalities in power, resources, or opportunities across groups in society. It can be expressed through beliefs, prejudices or behaviours/practices and can be based on race, ethnicity, culture or religion” (Paradies et al., 2009, p. 7). And this definition of racism is mirrored in the history of Indigenous Australians in the more distant past as well as in contemporary Australia. To be specific, the colonial history shows a typical example of institutional racism, a discriminatory limitation against ethnic groups via laws, practices, and policies (Hampton & Toombs, 2013, p. 30). At the beginning of colonisation, Europeans believed that they were superior to Indigenous people.…

    • 1152 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Savagery and civilisation play a major role in the interpretation of the novel; the treatment of the Aboriginal people is what draws the line between savagery and civilisation. Grenville depicts civilisation through Blackwood’s character. His lifestyle, family and land differ from the rest of the settlers enhancing the curiosity of the reader about Blackwood. On the other hand, savagery is pronounced by Smasher Sullivan, Blackwood’s opposing character. Smasher’s treatment towards the Aboriginal people disgusts the reader.…

    • 816 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The negative stereotypes impact on the Indigenous community of Australia as people act rudely to them as they believe these stereotypes. They assume they are dangerous so they stay away from them and treat them badly thinking they don’t feel emotions like white Australians do. The education system also contributes to the negative stereotypes of the Aboriginal community as instead of focusing on contemporary Aboriginal studies which can be quite positive they are focusing on the history which is full of negativity (Korff, 2014). These cruel stereotypes are enforcing the poor treatment of the Indigenous community. We need to work at destroying these negative stereotypes so the Indigenous community of Australia will get better treatment.…

    • 1000 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Australian Politicians

    • 1050 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Australia has a large historic past where Australian Politicians have legislated laws that dehumanises and represent the Indigenous as inferior or marginalise a social group by not letting them get married (eg. Marriage equality). Australian politicians in the past have manipulated many Australian’s that ‘different is bad’ and you shouldn’t be different because you’re considered as a threat in the nation and become alienated. By passing those ideologies that have educated the citizens the citizen will then pass it on to their offspring’s a new generation that will inherit the created hatred for diversity society made by politicians. Through historic context Australian Politicians have marginalised social groups that is different, for example during federation in 1901 with the oppression of pacific island workers called Kanakas and continued on with the increasingly racist and bigoted laws passed to marginalise Chinese, Italians and many other social groups through the early to mid 1900 's.…

    • 1050 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays