India's Global Threats: The Republic Of India

Amazing Essays
The Republic of India perpetuates an apprehension of threats on a daily basis. Neighboring or nearby countries, such as: China, Russia, Pakistan, and Iran, all pose deliberate peril to the economy, political stability, and military focal point of this rising world power. Amid constant global struggles for many nations to remain buoyant, India’s economy and infrastructure have shown a consistent, yet dramatic increase of substantial margins annually. India occupies a great dynamism that complements consistent progression so that India may become an independent world power within the next 15 years. India is the seventh largest country in the world and second in population. These numbers could be overwhelming odds to detour any country …show more content…
India, however, has brought many of these initiatives to the global community. One of the most noted programs has been India’s stance on climate change. Given the fact that India is an immense greenhouse gas emitter, India has partnered with the United States to show the world its dedication to provide resources with a cleaner environment. This initiative was a major negotiation with India and the United States so that both countries would promote a program of clean energy resources. Therefore, in regards to the question from the previous paragraph, yes, India’s global involvement has brought them recognition as an international market asset. Climate change and clean energy productivity have been a focal point of new political policies as India strives to advance as a global powerhouse in the twenty-first century. Politics have been a relentless variable for India throughout the last several decades. While deliberately working to set them on a course to become a world power in the near future, political issues tend to haunt this ever increasing status quo. In a question and answer session given by Tim Roemer, former United States Ambassador to India from 2009 – 2011, Mr. Roemer articulates a brief idea of the current struggle in India’s political …show more content…
The similarity is that the Parliament contains two houses: House of the People and the Council of the States. This two party system may seem to be a frugal part of the political diversity. Meanwhile, it also allows increased corruption among leaders. Corruption in an already unstable economy only tends to bring more distrust in the populace. When distrust occurs, the people have tendencies to rebel against the government which constitutes a more unstable political structure. Communal uprisings tend to create instability in the government, which may constitute military involvements and in turn have the potential to instigate poverty. This poverty is viewed as the cause of a strong political agenda, yet animosity builds from groups that may view political figures as individuals responsible for obvious turmoil. In 2014, the Mint News Press released an article showing a glimpse of the political corruption used near the elections: “This may be a socially conservative country, but you wouldn’t know that from the election that just ended, which was apparently all about booze, bribes and journalistic lies, all paid for by

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