Indian Removal Policy Analysis

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Register to read the introduction… They were brave and listened to the government, but they still lost their tribal land. During the 1830's the East coast was burdened with new settlers and becoming vastly populated. President Andrew Jackson and the government had to find a way to move people to the West to make room. He passed the Indian Removal Policy in1830. The Indian Removal Policy, which called for the removal of Native Americans from the Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, and the Georgia area. They also moved their capital Echota in Tennessee to the new capital called New Echota, Georgia and then they eventually moved to the Indian Territory. The Indian Territory was declared in the Act of Congress in 1830 with the Indian Removal Policy. The government of the United States did not really try all that hard to avoid the conflict even though they knew what kind of tragedy it would cause. According to President Andrew Jackson: "Humanity and national honor demand that every effort should be made to avert so great a calamity. It is too late to inquire whether it was just in the United States to include them and their territory within the bounds of the new States, whose limits they could control" (Filler 15).Elias Boudinot, Major Ridge, and John Ridge accepted the responsibility for the removal of the Cherokee, which was one of the largest tribes in the Southeast that were the earliest to adapt to European ways. There was …show more content…
The Tahlequah Agency in Oklahoma has said there were 42,992 Cherokee living in Tahlequah in 1982. The U.S. Census has shown 293,074 Cherokee are living in more than 30 states in the United States. Now the Cherokee Nation is under control of the first woman chief. In November 1983 Wilma Mankiller was elected to the office of the Cherokee Nation. The Cherokee survived the hardships of the Trail of Tears and the loss of their loved ones. Their population continues to grow despite losing everything that belonged to them (Bruchac …show more content…
A continual war existed between the Navajos and the New Mexicans, which eventually helped lead to the Navajo Long Walk. Apparently every time the Navajos signed a treaty, it was broken by the New Mexicans. In 1845, when the United Sates annexed Texas, they took possession of all of Mexico's Northern provinces. In August of 1946, Gen Stephen Kearney declared control over all citizens of the Territory of New Mexico, including Indian tribes. America thought that the Navajos would make a peace treaty binding all Navajos, but that was not the case. The Navajos were considered independent and if another province made a treaty, they would ignore it and continue to makes raids. The United States did not take this very well because if one Navajo committed a crime then the U.S. believed that all Navajos should be punished. The Americans totally took away the land that was rightfully theirs, but more importantly they took away their pride. "The Navajos fled before them, looking down from the heights above while there hohrahns went up in flames. All their horses and sheep were killed, the canyon floor was left bare, and the spirit of the Indians was broken" (Coolidge 25). Although the Long Walk of the Navajo caused fewer casualties than the Trail of Tears, it seems that it was more of a political issue involving a corrupt government. In today' word

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