The Indian Removal Act In The 1800's

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Indian Removal Act In the early 1800’s, America was a country of great hope and future promises. The colonies had just broken away from the monarchy of Great Britain and declared the independent of the United States of America. The people of Europe fled to America during this time in search of religious freedom and a new beginning. From the beginning of their arrival in America, the colonists began pushing the Native Americans west. In the early years, before America won its independence, they had pushed the Native Americans just out of the original thirteen colonies. However, after the colonists revolted against Britain, they saw a great influx in their population, and the idea of westward expansion. There were many issues that faced the new country with westward expansion, but one of the most controversial was the …show more content…
With advanced weapons and the desire to expand, it was a matter of time before there was conflict between the new country and Native Americans. In this paper, I will discuss the leading up to, the movement, and the results of the Indian Removal Act. In the beginning of the nineteenth century, the American government tried to civilize Native Americans and assimilate them into their culture. The government wanted these people to totally abandon their way of living and pick up the new American lifestyle. In December of 1829, Andrew Jackson had come to the realization that the Natives were not willing or able to assimilate into the “American” lifestyle, and came up with a plan

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