Andrew Jackson Indian Removal Act Analysis

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The Native Americans and the United States’ Government's relationship was not off to a great start in the 1800’s. When the settlers first came to America, the Natives viewed them as untrustworthy. The suspicions were confirmed, when the settlers started to expand into the Natives land. This caused conflicts and they were only solved by violence. Finally, the Americans and Natives came to the biggest conflict of all, The War of 1812. This was a war in 1812, between the Natives and the white settlers, and the Natives were defeated because of a surprise attack. As the settlers continued to move west, President Jackson decided to escort the Natives out, by making the Indian Removal Act. The author’s perspectives of the Indian Removal Act and the …show more content…
In his speech Andrew Jackson stated “What good man would prefer a country covered with forests and occupied by a few thousand savages to our great Republic, studded with cities, towns, and more than 12,000,000 happy people, and filled with all the blessings of liberty, civilization, and religion?” This shows Jackson’s reasons for the act, because he is telling the life we have already is much better than a forested area infested with savages. Jackson is showing his side of the thinking and why he creates this act. This act was an act of protection and for the better of the people, and that is why he did it. He was protecting his citizens by removing dangerous savages, in other words, Native Americans. His view on the Natives are that they will only cause more conflicts and put the settlers in danger, by removing the Natives the problem is being solved. This helps the reader understand both sides of the act because the reader now understand Jackson’s thinking of why the act is …show more content…
This differs from Jackson’s perspective in the State of the union Address because his perspective is that by removing the Natives he was saving his country. Both of these differ from the soldier’s perspective because his perspective was that the removal was a poor decision and was filled with sadness, and tragic consequences. Although the three sources all differ in perspectives and opinions, they help the reader shape an understanding of the events. The history channel helps by telling the reader the impacts, while Jackson tells the causes for the act and finally to complete the picture, the soldier tells the reader of specific detail of what happened on the trail. Jackson wanted America to be a particular way, which means no Native Americans. This led to Jackson to remove the Native Americans, leading to the Indian removal and the Trail of Tears. These events were significant to U.S. history because it showed the policies America can and will make about Native Americans or

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