Indian Removal Act Case Study

Decent Essays
American History
Assignment # 5
Indian Removal Act
What was Jackson’s view on Native Americans?
What was the impact of the Indian Removal Act?

Jackson before and during his presidency despised the Native Americans. He felt they should not be independent and that they could present a security issue for the United States, since Europe during that time period was trying to develop a bond with the various tribes to “prevent expansion” in the United States. Jackson believed and supported the white settlers in having the Indians, especially those located in the southeast part of the United States removed from the land they occupied, if the settlers wanted to settle on that section of land. He also felt the Native Americans were inferior and

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