Indian Removal Act Vs Trail Of Tears

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Ever since the settlers have moved to America, the Native Americans have been unhappy. They feel as if America is their home, and that these unwelcome visitors should leave. The U.S., on the other hand, feel that the Native Americans are keeping them from obtaining an amazing new country that earns riches with its industry and trade. Some Native Americans have aligned themselves with the U.S., they’ve even helped in wars, but, after years of fighting, Andrew Jackson is done with these Native Americans. He decides to ignore Congress and move the tribes to Oklahoma, thousands of miles from their homes. The authors’ perspectives on the Indian Removal Act/Trail of Tears shapes the reader's understanding of the events by showing different impacts …show more content…
The reader understands this because in one source, the Indian Removal Act was a heroic act that got rid of “savages” and allowed America to become great, while in the other two, it was shameful and evil of Americans to force innocents to walk thousands of miles, just to reach a home for the unwanted. The three sources help the readers gain a full understanding of events by showing all sides of the story. It shows the impacts and reasons for the Indian Removal Act/ Trail of Tears. The reader notes Andrew Jackson’s perspective, and how it differs from the soldier’s perspective. The reader sees the good in the Indian Removal Act, as well as the bad. They realize that the Indians were forced to suffer, but the settlers created cities and homes. It helps readers see the good and the bad in Andrew Jackson, how he ignored Congress, but thought that he was doing the right thing. With the early age of our country, everything that happened would determine what generations would do. It showed us how Americans could act, and how our choices could impact others. It also shows future generations the mistakes that can be made if you only look at one side of the

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