Andrew Jackson Trail Of Tears Analysis

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Many people don’t like the twenty dollar bill because Andrew Jackson is on it.The Native Americans were living in what is current U.S. land. As more and more people were migrating to the U.S., the more land they were going to need. The New Americans were starting to build homes on the Natives land. At This was all happening when Andrew Jackson was the President. He felt that the new Americans needed more land to grow the population of the United States. So with that Jackson had a plan and was ready to take action. The authors perspective of the Indian Removal Act/ the Trail of Tears shaped the reader's understanding because they were shown all sides of the story and they were told that it was a horrible journey and that they had to go without blankets, but on the other hand they were told that …show more content…
The sources helped shape the reader's understanding because the reader is able to get all three points of views to better understand that the Indian Removal act could be bad or good based on their thoughts from the evidence.The Indian Removal Act and the Trail of Tears are significant in U.S. history because it showed how in the past and possibly even still how Americans feel and act in these types of acts/policies. America wanted more land for themselves so they had to get rid of the Natives to gain the land and they didn’t care how the Natives were treated or the losses that they had to go through. Even though some Americans and some soldiers knew this was wrong, the majority felt that it was ok just because they would gain more land and of the Natives weren’t willing to change their ways of life, then it was ok to force them away so the others who knew how wrong it was didn’t say

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