Indian Mascots Analysis

995 Words 4 Pages
In the article “Racism American Style and Resistance to Change: Art Education’s Role in the Indian Mascot Issue,” art educator Elizabeth M. Delacruz attempts to find an explanation for the popularity of Indian mascots by selecting cases and examining the history of the issue. She states 1500 public schools in the United States use Indian mascots. While these schools continue to represent their mascots, the disturbing past of public schools’ early development of the Indian mascots hides behind closed doors. In the 1920s, Indian mascots were developed by White schools in conjunction with practices emanating from Indian Boarding Schools. Children were removed from their homes and incarcerated into American schools to learn American culture. In …show more content…
She says Native American children were universally named and trained as mascot Indians to support their school’s sports. In the 1910s, there was a pattern of White schools having animal mascots. As new White schools formed, they adopted the Indian mascots due to them believing Native Americans were an animal race, which fit well with the previous pattern. By the 1920s, the mascots went nationwide in public schools. Delacruz says, “Manipulating Indian identity had become a ritualized entertainment facet of Whites.” Consequently, the Whites racist entertainment over 90 years ago transformed to a norm in today’s society, which is known as dysconscious racism, numbness and ignorance that develops among privilege Whites after a lifetime of racist acts and …show more content…
Grose informs readers about the psychological impact of racial stereotypes and Indian mascots on Native Americans, while also exploring court cases involving teams with Indian mascots. Grose says many people argue that sport team names like the Redskins, Indians, and Warriors do not harm anyone. However, those names do affect Native American children’s self esteem and well-being. In 2005, the American Psychological Association, APA, made several conclusions on the issues, which state “the continued use of American Indian mascots, symbols, images, and personalities undermines the educational experiences of members of all communities - especially those who have had little contact with Indigenous people.” The APA also includes the unwelcome and hostile learning environments American Indians experience due to the images and stereotypes that are promoted in society. The APA proves how Indian mascots and names have a negative effect on Native Americans while also noting it is a violation against their civil rights. Grose states the Supreme Court had a chance to resolve the racial issues involving team names and mascots, but they turned down the opportunity for change in 2009 in the Harjo v. Pro-Football, Incorporative case. The case involved Native Americans arguing that the name of the Washington Redskins football

Related Documents