Full Inclusion Essay

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Inclusion exposes special education students to a learning environment in which they are exposed to other children and different teaching techniques. This may be a great help to these students as they are allowed to interact with other children who learn differently and are in normal classrooms in which they can grow and learn as a part of a whole rather than an individual in a special education classroom. This can lead to greater educational growth in the special education pupil as well as a greater understanding from their peers alike of differing ways of learning and growth of the students as a whole. However; special education students can also lead to a slower class environment as they require more one on one attention than normal students …show more content…
The learning gap between special education students and normal children can grow further apart in some extreme circumstances as the special education students work to attempt to grasp the same concepts as their …show more content…
With normal classroom settings being adaptive to special needs children, special education classrooms allow disability students to grow and function as they receive individualized attention from staff specially trained to handle their needs and are capable of facilitating the needs of the children. Several people think that inclusion will simply re-identify a need for separate special education for disabled students without also identifying the benefits of the system as a whole. A more generalized concern by some includes when the inclusive work in a school system becomes operationalized in the school, with a stronger concern being raised within specific disability groups. For example, many state that people the deaf community as inclusive classes for those students require the workload of both the teacher and the student to grow exponentially as they both work in order to convey information which requires more time while the rest of the class

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