Inclusion In Education Essay

1455 Words 6 Pages
Inclusion does not necessarily have a single definition; it is a complex concept, which can be interpreted in various ways. The definition of inclusion varies on the group that is being focused on, for example gender, race, disability and sex. It can also vary on the setting where it occurs, for example the school, workplace and the community (Kuegel, 2014). Reid (2005) suggests that inclusion in the context of public education can be defined as matching the available resources to the learning styles and educational needs of the pupils, with the aim to cater for all children. It is essential that the individual needs of all children, particularly those with additional and special educational needs (SEN) are not overlooked. However, the national …show more content…
In this case, the disabled child is bound to face the following questions: Why educate these children? Are the children with severe disability not educable? The Warnock report suggests that the answer to these questions is that education is a basic right of every human being, which brings significant benefits not only to the children who are taught, but to society as a whole. Even the most severely disabled children is still human and should therefore be educated as such, as no child is truly uneducable (Warnock, 1978). However, Cigman (2007) has a different opinion from the Warnock report on why disable children should be educated. Cigman (2007) stated that there are no legitimate reasons that justify separating children for their education and that it is the right of all children to learn together. Moreover, he claims that they should not be devalued or discriminated against by being excluded from other children only because of their disability, as they need mainstream education to help them develop relationships and prepare them for life with the rest of society. Moreover, this report suggests that disabled children should be educated as they are human. Until the 1980s, young …show more content…
The Act resulted in substantial change to the laws around children with SEN, leading to publication of the new SEND code of practice (Kuegel, 2014). The 2014 SEND code of practice covers the 0-25 age range and it includes guidance related to disabled children, young people and those with SEN. In the new SEND code of practice, schools will now be required to follow an ‘assess, plan, do, and review’ cycle, which will involve external professionals when necessary (Department for Education, 2014). Statements will now be replaced by Education, Health, and Care Plans, which will provide statutory protection comparable to statements. The Education, Health, Care and Plan will now extend to 19 year olds regardless of whether they are in full-time education (Sluckin and Smith,

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