Kobe Bryant Case Study

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Sexual assault is an epidemic that has reached significant proportion as newer generations become increasingly aware of its presence. As the public becomes more knowledgeable about rape and assault, they also become mindful that individuals, such as the Brock Turner case, were able to defend their case effectively leading to a shorter sentence and less punishment. In recent decades, the eminence of power and status creates a faulty line for those who have committed previous attacks; celebrities and other famous individuals seem to easily overcome the obstacles of accusation in court. The popular press article “In Kobe Bryant Case, Issues of Power, Not of Race” by Kirk Johnson (2004), exemplified the fact that in the case of Kobe Bryant, it …show more content…
Case studies analyze particular studies of an individual or a community that stress the developmental factors in relation to their environment. Case studies are not the most efficient way of studying universal principles since it is merely based on discrete ideas and ways of life, and due to only being based on homogeneous ideals and considerations. Therefore, case studies do not include a sample size which provides a way of statistically analyzing data with a sufficient power to extrapolate among the whole population as well as major subgroups. A sample size is a way of inference to the general public in which a number of chosen people or observations are conducted. The article by Knight has an experimental design and does include a sample size that gathers the dispositions of the volunteers. Yet the sampling procedure Knight used was inadequate because it lacked random sampling and a larger sample size. Even though Knight’s sampling procedure and sample size may include voluntary response bias and atypical reports, it at least includes this sample and is not generalized to one individual of high status such as in Johnson’s article. Johnson (2004) could have easily included a sample size from another source to support his findings such as when he said that the woman who accused Kobe Bryant of race may be accused of deceitfulness. How many …show more content…
Generalizability is simply the way the data and findings can be generalized to the entire population. Something does not have strong generalizability if it does not include a satisfactory sample. In Johnson’s case, one case cannot be generalized to the entire public because it does not express multiple views that would be extrapolated to other groups or individuals. In Knight’s case, although it seems that the data can sometimes considerably be seen to be true in the public’s eye does not mean that the views of 71 voluntary participants can be generalized to the whole population. The generalizability would be acceptable if the sample size is adequate in both cases as

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