In Gender Troubles: Audre Lorde And Judith Butler

Improved Essays
Lorde and Butler
Society has a strange fixation with placing anything and everything into one category or another. Talking to any person today can show just how different and similar one can be to another. For instance, when you think of a writer, how many varying faces and personalities’ rushes through your head? Audre Lorde and Judith Butler are two such writers that share a connection through their craft and their meaning. Though they may have these general similarities, they have their own approaches to specific problems and issues. In society, people are thrust into categories previously developed to further relate one to another. For both of these theorists, the groupings that individuals are thrown into are lacking to say mildly. Judith Butler believed that feminism had made a mistake when its claim of being the union of all women. In this, she states that by claiming this, feminism is agreeing to the binary structure of gender that society has constructed. By doing this, feminism is effectively ignoring the differences and choices people have made by forcing them into a category that it to broad to truly express who they are. Audre Lorde refused to be put into any category, instead, she created her own, “a
…show more content…
The performance is not an insight as to who a person truly is, but what a person does at a specific time. Her idea that identity is a free-floating form and not a description of some core essence is a key part of queer theory. With this and her thoughts of how sex, male and female, are not connected to gender, masculine and feminine, and desire, to the other gender, leads her to have a very open view of sexuality in itself. Judith Butler, along with her wants to end the binary construct that we know as gender today for a more expressive system, is an acceptance as well as an advocate for equal treatment for people of all

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Butler says that Women should take an antifoundalist approach, where they do not use "identity" as a basis to produce the meaning of a union. Butler says the definition of gender ought to be "permanently deferred" and left accessible to meaning at any times. This will make better unions and effectively promote representation. There are "intelligible" genders that sustain coherence and continuity between sex, gender, sexual practice and sexual attraction. The only valid notion of "truth" in gender identity is rooted in the regular practices, that creates coherent gender identities that are embedded in a set of pre-existing…

    • 745 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Butler might argue that to be a woman one would have to fall under societies idea of what it means to be a woman. The physical form determines absolutely nothing about gender identity, it merely provides a corporeal platform in which one can display their performative gender. Butler, surely, understands the importance of gender identity and the reality of gender within society. Stryker’s issue with Butler, however, is that her language is not beneficial for trans identities who seek to highlight the significance of the authenticity of their experience as one gender. It also fails to legitimize transgender people who are “non-passing” and therefore do not abide by the rules assigned to either gender in the binary.…

    • 734 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    The distinction of what it means to be a woman or a man has come under intense scrutiny, As Simone de Beauvoir states, “One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman.” The concept of ‘identity’ as something that is fixed or assigned to people by socializing agents is challenged by feminist theories. In today’s culture it is argued that we are being gender socialised, social forces have embedded in us what it meaning to be ‘feminine’ or ‘masculine’ shaping the way we are act as women and men. Feminist scholar Mac-Kinnon argues that sexuality is “the process which creates, organises,..creating the social beings we know as women and men’ she goes on to explain that The division of gender is founded on the ‘the social requirements of heterosexuality , which institutionalises male sexual dominance and female sexual submission” which reinforces patriarchy and creates an unequal distinction between the sexes. However this view has been criticised due to its over simplification of gender down to just sexuality, ignoring other parts of the gender narrative and the institutional effects. Gender is not just a social role that unifies social individuals.…

    • 1345 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    122). As Wijitbusaba (2005) has elucidated, although gender neutrality needs to be further explored in Foucault’s work, the work of Foucault in the Discipline and Punish (1975) and The History of Sexuality (1976) has offered feminists a view of seeing the relationship between sexuality and wider social forces to the traditional functionalism, that creates a ground for a positive area of resistance for divergent groups and individuals (p. 124). Dorothy Smith, a standpoint theorist and feminist sociologist, argues that women have been ignored and objectified in sociology (Siedman, 2008, p. 204). Smith contends that women in sociology are placed in a state of contradiction, called a ‘bifurcation of consciousness’, in relation to their experiences of the world (Bowell, 2010). Smith argues that sociological discourse, has been authorised by men that are based on only men’s lived experiences, not women’s (Siedman, 2008, p. 204).…

    • 742 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Gender Reflection Essay

    • 779 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Synthesis: Communication plays a huge part in the normalization of gender roles. We as citizens, allow gender to become a norm by unconsciously creating and practicing these roles, without realizing the effects it has on individuals and society as a whole. The act of practicing gender through communication is seen with things like "you hit like a girl" or "you 're such a tomboy". By saying things like this you 're implying that one gender is better than the other. You are also stating that they are not conforming to their gender roles through communication.…

    • 779 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Gender roles are shaped by a stereotypical society and both sexes have to act and behave in such a way that is appropriate. The characters mentioned are those who have stepped out of the stereotypical circle and became the modern representation of gender in today’s society. The thing that I take from Middlemarch is a women do not have to conform to society. They are allowed to be their unique individual selves and defy the role that society gives them. In the end, Middlemarch wouldn’t have been the same without Dorthea and Casaubon, Lydgate and Rosamond, Fred Vincy, and Mrs. Cadwallader.…

    • 1345 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The reason for this is because these issues have a lot to do with gender identity and sexuality. The articles seem to provide a spectrum of viewpoints. For instance, Burkette states that “people who haven’t lived their whole lives as women, whether Ms. Jenner or Mr. Summers, shouldn’t get to define us” (17). As can be seen, scholars like Burkette would argue that it is experience that defines a woman. In making such statements, she herself is putting women into the “tidy box” she claims she has fought against.…

    • 718 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Butler’s ideas on queerness and gender will not only empower others, but it will help social workers in their practice. One of Butler’s ideas is that sex, gender and sexuality are not linked together. Butler questions the distinction between sex and gender. Butler…

    • 1056 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Definition Of Feminism

    • 945 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Anyone in the world can label themselves as being a feminist. If I were to walk up to someone on the street and ask them if they were a feminist, I would either get a yes or no in response. For this reason, simply claiming to be a feminist holds nowhere near as much significance as to why one is a feminist. I myself am a feminist, and the reasons regarding why I allow myself to be considered a feminist is far more meaningful than the label of calling myself a feminist. Therefore, my definition of feminism is this- it is the primary way in which I perceive the world around me.…

    • 945 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    First, the link between language and gender is important because it shows how that certain terms, phrases, and descriptions of women and their experience can create problematic identities that do not adequately represent their lived experience. Second, an examination of gendered subjectivity reveals that identities based on sex instead of gender are problematic and what is needed is to challenge of the essentialist view that divides sexual difference into dichotomies. Third, power-relations show that assumed gender specific roles and characters reinforce domination and control of specific identities in both micro and macro settings. Finally, these three topics are important when looking at the construction of foreign aid policies about women’s reproductive rights because of the way foreign aid policies use universalizing language, normalize rigid gender roles, and reinforce a male standard of value that asserts problematic power-structures behind women’s reproductive rights and choice. For these reasons the use of a feminist poststructuralist critique would be instrumental within IR theory, in particular the writing and implementation of foreign aid policies because they have real-world effects on the women of which they are written…

    • 1095 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays