Impressionism Vs Expressionism

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Expressionism varied significantly from its predecessor, Impressionism. Contrary to Impressionism, Expressionism’s “main interests were not to recreate the imprint recommended by the world, but to strongly enforce the artist's own sensibility to the world's image” (Web museum 1). Expressionism introduced a new standards in which one can create and judge art. Art was meant to be a passion that comes forth from within the artist, not from a depiction that the external visual world recommends. The new stranded for rating the quality of an artist’s artwork was now the character of the artist’s emotions. Expressionist artists introduced swirling, swaying and overstated brushstroke in the depiction their subject. These unique style of creating art

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