Pros And Cons Of Vaccination In Medicine

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Vaccination: Beneficial Advancement in Medicine Global Immunization has risen in recent years, whereas four out of twenty-five children did not receive the Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine in 2013 (Vaccine Coverage And Determinants Of Incomplete Vaccination In Children Aged 12-23 Months In Dschang, West Region, Cameroon: A Cross-Sectional Survey During A Polio Outbreak 2). When it comes to the discussion of vaccination, most of us will readily agree that immunization is imperative for the eradication of incurable viruses. Where the argument usually ends, however, is on the question of the inconsequential risk of adverse complications. Whereas some are convinced that vaccines are counterproductive, others maintain that vaccination exceeds …show more content…
Geoboo Song, author of "Understanding Public Perceptions Of Benefits And Risks Of Childhood Vaccinations In The United States,” acknowledges the presence of aluminum and mercury found in some vaccines that potentially could have negative effects on a child’s development (Song 542). By focusing on the insignificant amount of these alarming ingredients in vaccines, he over looks the deeper problem of preventing the spread of disease. Also, the redundant mentioning of thimerosal being responsible for disorders such as autism (Song 542). While it is true the vaccine does contain the ingredient thimerosal, it does not necessarily follow that it causes autism. According to Qrenstein and Yang, authors of “From Beginning To End: The Importance Of Evidence-Based Policymaking In Vaccination Mandates” that it is imperative the “right to control or refuse medical treatments,” (Orenstein and Yang 99). Although, I agree with Orenstein and Yang up to a point, I cannot accept their overall conclusion that vaccination is a matter of personal preferences rather than a medical revelation to build an immunity. Jacobson v. Massachusetts removed the requirement of adults receiving smallpox vaccination (Orenstein and Yang 99). Proponents of required vaccination are right to argue that it does impose restrictions on their personal rights. But they exaggerate when they claim informed immunization goes against their …show more content…
A populated area requires more than ninety-five precent of the people to be vaccinated in order to prevent outbreaks (Song 542). Song further claims vaccines are mostly necessary for lowering the deaths of infants with the eradication of fatal diseases (Song 542). These findings challenge the work of earlier reachers, who tended to assume that vaccinations are harmful to young children. Although preventing susceptible individuals may seem only concern to only a small group of people, it should in fact concern anyone who cares about the lives of their community. The potentially fatal, whooping cough resurged in an outbreak in Oklahoma during 1983 with three hundred people falling ill (Taking Sides Clashing Views on Controversial Issues in Health and Society 328). In other words, the entire community could be affected by an outbreak not only infants and individuals with weak immune systems. According to “Taking Sides Clashing Views on Controversial Issues in Health and Society,” each year, whooping cough results in the fatality of about eight thousand children (Taking Sides Clashing Views on Controversial Issues in Health and Society 329). Their point is that this statistic confronts the excessive amounts of young lives being lost to a disease easily prevented with vaccine. Ultimately, what is at stake here is the unwarranted death of

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