Training Needs Analysis Essay

Improved Essays
Background to training needs in an organisational context
There are many different definitions of a training need. According to Garavan et al (2003) who defines a training need as follows:

" We define a training need as a need for human performance improvement arising from a deficit or an opportunity that can be met by an appropriate training intervention"

Its is very important for organisations to identify gaps in performance, or gaps in future performance and more importantly if training is an appropriate intervention that can meet those gaps. Training and development will not fix all perceived problems or weakness 's. Training needs can be described as reactive and proactive. When a organisation identifies a gap in performance
…show more content…
This can lead to greater confidence and support in the training and develop department.

Issues surrounding Training Needs Analysis (TNA)
There are many barriers to performing a training needs analysis in an organisation. While a training needs analysis is so important, it is sometimes seen as a time consuming and costly process. It is very difficult to measure the return on the cost involved. Some stakeholders will be reluctant to expose issues that highlight their own under performance. Some managers underestimate the importance of a training and development department; they want a ‘quick fix’. They often perceive to know the issues and what interventions are required. Managers may feel that a training intervention is an obvious solution to a training need and wonder why such a level of analysis is required. The success of the TNA requires management support and engagement. The quality and success of the TNA is largely down to the experience and expertise of the individual completing the TNA. Depending on the size of the organization and if there is a training and development department in place this experience may be

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    Some disadvantages to this type of needs assessments are that is labor intensive and sometimes difficult to analyze. Knowledge tests are beneficial in helping trainers identify what to include in a knowledge-based program. The advantage to the test is that it measures knowledge versus attitude. A potential disadvantage is that the items on the test may not actually reflect the knowledge used on the job (Grensing-Pophal,…

    • 1496 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The needs analysis can be performed using a number of methods, including interviews, review of performance appraisals and review of defective product and safety reports. The needs analysis focuses the training objectives by identifying the current state, the desired state and the information and skills that will be required to bridge that divide. Once the training objective has been identified, the training team can determine the best method to deliver and evaluate training. Performing this type of analysis ensures that scarce training resources are only utilized for issues that can be resolved by training. Managers may suspect a training deficiency if an employee or group is not performing as expected, but a thorough needs analysis may identify other issues, such as low employee morale, understaffing or inefficient process design.…

    • 772 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    At times for some management, performance evaluations are a complicated task that they dread completing. There are multiple reasons why managers do not like to assess their employees. Although, performance evaluations are not normally a task that some managers look forward to completing, they are necessary in every organization. Employees have a right to know how their work is progressing in the eyes of management, whether their career progression is positive or negative within their respective organization. There is a right and wrong way to get through the evaluation process that can be difficult for both management and employees but when the right steps are taken it makes the process efficient.…

    • 1025 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Improved Essays

    As highlighted, there are certain challenges that may be associated with each concept and many organizations may find themselves handling struggling to address the risks associated with such challenges. Without doubt, adopting a team-based organization performance is not an easy task for many organizations. However, taking into consideration all the critical aspects described can make the journey easier. It is possible to have functional teams appropriately formed as long as they prove to be dependable, and the organization has a specific focus. In addition, having a buy-in concept, proper coordination, registering impact, and exhibiting vitality may help an organization achieve remarkable performance through…

    • 1969 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Often selection of new employees is limited if not based on remuneration package, which may not be best suited to line manager. HRD and Operation team may be looking at different skills and personality traits in a person to be recruited. Conclusions: Organizations must have a clearly defines strategy for tasks often passed on to line managers. The strategy should include identifying right people for this role, train them and allow them with fairness to be able to have time to delivery desired results. The performance of such line managers in dual role should be carefully monitored and they should be adequately compensated to perform very important role of developing new employees.…

    • 931 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The big assumption is important to understand with a change resistant employee as you want to understand the real reason why they are struggling to change their behavior. It is also important for supervisors to work through the process of helping the individual to find their competing commitments, particularly since an individual may not realize why they are sabotaging themselves or the reason behind their behavior. I think it is easy to become frustrated with a change-resistant employee if, on the surface, it appears they have been given all the necessary tools to enact change, when, in reality, the real reason behind their behavior is not being addressed. If a leader is truly trying to develop an employee then they need to take the time to find the root of the issue, and not just try to fix what appears to the issue on the…

    • 1212 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Yet, with continual change comes with employee resistance to change. Each employee’s reason to resist change can be different and can be different from one change event to another. For this reason, a manager must become well versed in the techniques to overcome employee resistance to change. Depending on the change, the education and communication technique might bring position results. Then on a later change, either the planning and implementation or the negotiation technique might be a better fit.…

    • 765 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Training needs hinder the workforce in the accomplishment of their job responsibilities and also prevent an organisation from achieving its set objectives. There is usually a mismatch between predictable times for implementation, which is taken into account during strategy formulation stage and the actual time needed it takes to complete the execution of the strategy (Al-Ghamdi, 1998).Thus, the aim of training needs analysis should ensure that training deals with existing problems, is custom-made to organisational objectives, and is conveyed in a cost-efficient and effective…

    • 765 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Job Analysis Paper

    • 922 Words
    • 4 Pages

    4). Job analysis is vital for training as they help managers determine which areas will require job training (Foster, 2010, p. 592). Organizations would be wasting scarce resources without a thorough training assessment. The goal of performance appraisals are improved communication, increased employee motivation, effective distribution of rewards, and sound research. Foster (2010) states job analysis is “critical for the proper development of performance appraisals” (p. 591).…

    • 922 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The availability of major factors causes raters to focus on minor re-occurring factors. The self-fulfilling prophecies or expectations can possibly interfere with adequately evaluation an employee by causing the rater to see what he expects to see. The fundamental attribution error can cause a rater to blame others and fail to give credit when credit is deserved. Organizations can tailor a performance evaluation system that can eliminate or reduce these types of biases by conducting appropriate training with…

    • 797 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays

Related Topics