Importance Of The Judicial Branch

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Although the Judicial branch is the last branch of government, it is by no means less important than the other two branches of government. This branch is composed of the Supreme Court and the lower federal court system and is in charge of interpreting the law. In the third article of the Constitution, all courts in the Judicial branch have the power to decipher the law, have a Chief Justice who is in charge of making the hard decisions over trials that deal with presidential impeachment, and have the ability to practice judicial review. Judicial Review was first introduced as a main component of the Judicial branch in by John Marshall in 1803 during the case of Marbury vs. Madison. Because of judicial review, the Supreme Court is able to decided …show more content…
The judges who make these decisions are first nominated by the president and then voted on by the Senate and normally serve for life or until they are impeached. The federal courts also have a unique structure and Congress has created two different kinds of federal courts that have not been previously decided upon by the Supreme Court. First is a constitutional court where judges are offered constitutional protection and the most important constitutional court is the district court which are the lowest federal courts and the only place where federal trials are held. Next is the courts of appeals where they hear appeals from district courts and no trials are offered. Lastly, legislative courts are courts that were created in the same way as constitutional courts but the judges present are not given constitutional protection such as a fixed salary and job as well as they are under “good behavior” (Wilson 437). Because America’s court system is a dual system that consists of one state and one federal court, there are many kinds of different cases that the federal courts hear before the Supreme …show more content…
The federal court system also places specific laws and rules in place so that everyone can have the ability to be heard in courts. In forma pauperis gives poorer individuals the opportunity to have their cases heard in a federal court without being charged. Not only this, but other laws have made it easier to make someone else pay fees involving lawsuits due to fee shifting that allows a plaintiff, the party that starts the lawsuit, to recover the costs from the defendant if the plaintiff ends up winning the case (Wilson 443). However, not everyone can have his or her case heard due to a rule called standing that states a legal concept to refer who is entitled to bring a case. Not only this, but due to sovereign immunity, a citizen cannot sue the government without the government 's consent to ensure government standings. Although some of these rules can seem harsh, there are other rules such as class-action suit that allows someone to bring a case before the court on behalf of others in a similar situation (Wilson

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