Importance Of Teachings In Protagoras And Meno

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It is difficult to understand what virtue truly is and if everyone is born with it and if it develops over time. Plato brings this question to the forefront in Protagoras and Meno. During a particular discussion, Socrates questions Protagoras on whether virtue can truthfully be taught. Protagoras then provides admirable evidence proving that virtue can be educated to all human beings. Protagoras does this by providing a number of examples backing up his beliefs. Through the use of punishment both in correctional facilities as well as in society virtue is taught to those being punished. Throughout ones childhood, in their home lives, educational institutes, and society virtue is instilled in people. Lastly, all individuals, whether they show …show more content…
One idea that is expressed by Protagoras is the impression that by punishing civilians, society is teaching them how to be virtuous in the future. Protagoras claims that, “the idea is to stop the person who did wrong from doing wrong again” (24). Accordingly, society does not put someone in a correctional facility for them to wait to be released and continue to commit acts of crime. They are in the correctional facility to learn and grow from their mistakes and become educated on how to be virtuous. Protagoras clarifies this when he states, “you don’t punish wrongdoers with the single-minded aim of paying them back for the wrong they’ve done” (24). Societies aim to educate those who have done wrong while they are being punished. Protagoras makes this point extremely valid when he uses Athens as an example, “ as a rule, societies do punish wrongdoers, and Athenians society is no exception” (24). Protagoras clarifies that virtue is not only taught is specific areas; it is taught all over the world. By applying an example to a place these men know, it strengthens the argument that virtue can indeed be taught through the use of …show more content…
Protagoras does this by using examples in everyday society. He begins with punishment and how society does not seek to only punish people who are not virtuous; punishment is also there to provide education and growth to those who have done wrong. Along with punishment, Protagoras discusses that people are educated throughout all phases of ones life on how to act virtuous. Parents, Teachers and society all provide education on how to be virtuous. Finally, Protagoras uses Socrates example and effectively shows that everyone has some sort of virtue in himself or herself, although it may be more evident in some and not in others. Through these three main arguments Protagoras does an exceptional job showing that virtue can be taught to everyone over

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