Importance Of Superior Positioning In Chess

1878 Words 8 Pages
strategies like this requires much practice and is exceptionally advanced. I personally strive to discover and attain these strategical and tactical superior positions in my own chess games, however they are not only difficult to discover, they’re also risky for if you do not calculate a certain possibility or logical move from your opponent when you’re thinking 3 to 4 moves ahead, you make a brash sacrifice and end up in a losing position both materially, and strategically. Keeping this in mind what does it mean to have a superior position in a chess game? In general, superior positioning means the player controls more space. The more squares your pieces occupy, attack, or defend the fewer options your opponent has thus, the opponent is forced …show more content…
A chess tactic refers to a sequence of moves that limits the opponent’s options and may result in a tangible gain. Tactics include forks, skewers, batteries, discovered attacks, undermining, overloading, deflection, pins, and interference. The basic attack in chess is moving a piece to a square that then puts that piece at a position where the next move it could capture the piece it 's attacking. A defense is when a piece is moved to a square which allows the piece to defend the attacked piece which means that if the opponent takes the piece you take back their piece (called an exchange) or it discourages the opponent from taking the piece in the first place. For example, a queen may attack a defended pawn and if the queen takes the defended pawn then they would exchange a queen for a pawn being left with a huge material …show more content…
Let’s move on to my personal research that I got from interviewing my grandfather and uncle both experienced chess player, and my visitation. My first interview was with my grandfather. I chose to interview my grandfather because he is a very experienced chess player who has played his entire life. I knew that I would learn something new from my grandfather because of all the experience that my grandfather has behind him. And sure enough, I did learn something new. Not only did I learn about the history of how my grandfather became interested in chess, I learned a new way of learning about chess. For grandpa, he never analyzed his chess games he learned from watching the older kids play and applying the skills he learned from watching his own games. This showed me that to learn chess you don’t just study your own games or have people teach you, you have to watch older more experienced players and analyze their games, try to understand why they 're making certain moves, what’s their strategy, see how and what tactics their applying, etc. My grandfather was also my mentor and I learned a lot from playing chess against him. Because my grandfather is so experienced I could not beat him using basic strategies or tactics. I assimilated new knowledge about unfamiliar openings, strategies, and tactics in my pursuit to win against him, and I succeeded. Now when I play against grandpa I consistently win one out of two games. My

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