Summary: The Importance Of Strength Training

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Strength- Strength is defined as the body’s ability to deal with a form of weight, be it lifting a weight, pushing/pulling something or withstanding pressure. Strength is considered to be an anaerobic component in that it usually doesn’t take longer than 2 minutes (if it did it would be pushing into muscular endurance.) This type of resistance training can lead to hypertrophy, resulting in larger, denser muscles as when you create micro-tears in the muscles, the body overcompensates by making new muscle fibres. This leads to stronger muscles, this is called adaptation. Adaptation is changing to your environment/ the stresses and strains placed upon the body. Also when you begin training your central nervous system can be improved as the body …show more content…
Strength training can lead to denser bones which help with withstanding pressure in exercises such as squats. Strength will be reversed by atrophy (where the muscles waste away due to a lack of use) and a lack of protein can lead to no new muscle being gained despite a rigorous and varied training program. The role of protein is to repair and rebuild muscle fibre. Neurogenic atrophy is where the muscles waste away due to injury or illness whereas disuse atrophy is the wastage of muscle through a lack of use. Type 2i muscle fibres are very important for strength training as even though they aren’t very good at enduring stress over long periods of time, they have a good balance between strong, fast movements and endurance (around 8-12 reps, 3-5 sets.) Strength training also needs to be supported by a very protein based diet with thousands of calories to support muscle growth as well as the calories you burn when exercising (Eddie Hall, one of the world’s strongest men, eats around 10,000 calories a day and many non-competitive lifters eat around 6 meals a day and consume around 6,000 calories. The recommended daily allowance for a man is 2,500 calories and for a woman it’s 2,000 …show more content…
a powerlifter doing 3 reps for squats as fast as they can, they can’t do anymore because they have expended all of their energy, this will lead to them needing rest (short amounts, around 90 seconds to 2 minutes.) Power is also considered to be an anaerobic component. Power is very similar to strength in terms of hypertrophy and how the muscles adapt to the stress placed upon them but the difference is that power uses type 2ii muscle fibres which are very powerful but aren’t built for endurance, meaning someone who trains at 3 reps can lift ridiculously heavy weights but for a very short period time whereas someone who does 6 reps can go for longer but can’t lift as heavy weight. Power can massively improve strength as the higher weights for lower reps can help an athlete push past plateaus as well as add variation to their workouts. Flexibility is also utilised in exercises such as squats and deadlifts as the exercises cannot be performed properly with inflexible

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