Importance Of Social Values

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Before recognise the conflict of values in the social society, we should understand what and the important of social values in a society. Social values are an important part in the culture of the society. The values highlight the stability of the social order. The social values provides general guidelines for social conduct. Social value is a belief of the society about the desirability of etiquettes portrays or aim of a certain action. In which it indicates the degrees of something is regarded as good versus bad. Values such as fundamental rights, patriotism, respect for human dignity, rationality, sacrifice, individuality, equality and democracy are used to guide our behaviour in specific situation. Values are used as the benchmarks in assessing …show more content…
Social values can be divide to specific and general values. The certain things that appreciated by the majority of a society is referred as specific value. Therefore, the members of the society will look up to these things. For example, “…performing the Haj (the fifth pillar of Islam is pilgrimage to Mecca during the month of Dhu al-Hijja) in Mecca. Pilgrimage to Mecca during Dhu'l Hijja, has become the religious objective of all Muslims and is of specific value to Muslims. Those who have done so will be accorded a higher status in the Malay Islamic society. Hence, many Muslims will make an effort to perform the Haj, not only because it is religiously required, but also because it allows for social benefits such as a higher status and respect.” based from Zahid Emby & Sarjit Singh (2012). Whereas, general values are the general and abstract things that cherished by most people in a society. For example, the life style, food selection, health conservation and democracy in the government ruling by the people, exercised either directly or through elected representatives. These aspects are essential values commonly esteemed by Malaysians, regardless of race or …show more content…
While a rights-based approach is associated with the Enlightenment and modernity, a virtues-based approach emerges from traditional society. When modernists carry out acts regarded as obligatory or good within their own moral order, "these very acts offend traditionalists."[12] Inter-racial or inter-religious marriages, for example, are seen by many as one outgrowth of inclusivity and tolerance. The freedom to marry anyone is a "right." Traditionalists, however, would see it as evil - harming their race or religion. Likewise, some traditional religious and political activities, for instance, limiting women's dress, freedom of movement, education, and/or public involvement is seen as abhorrent to modern, Western societies. The freedom to wear what one wants, and do what one wants, with no limitations, is seen as a woman's right. Yet the freedom that women exhibit in Western societies is abhorrent to some very traditional Muslim cultures, in which women's modesty is seen as a virtue. In short, the two groups have clashing conceptions of moral

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