Importance Of Purpose In Economics And Political Science

Superior Essays
As an undergraduate student, I spent an extensive amount of time trying to articulate why I should choose a particular calling over others. I am intellectually curious and prefer perceiving information in an interdisciplinary manner. Thus, the necessity to choose one or two majors imposed a challenge. Studying at a liberal arts college reassured me in the idea that the fields I was primarily interested in – Economics and Political Science – are not isolated or restrictive. Both are based on a premise that there is a perpetual need to observe human behaviour in order to draw informed and sound conclusions about the world we live in. Whether it is by trying to quantify the effect of one’s gender on choosing a certain profession, or by attempting …show more content…
It was not until slightly later that I realized how programming will become an integral part of my life. After taking a class in Introduction to Logic, my desire to redirect the focus of my studies and dedicate my intellectual efforts to a more practical field - one which enables me to observe the products of my labour, while also having the freedom to conceptualize and keep creativity a part of my life – progressed from its incipient stage to an idea I was considering more seriously. This course helped me articulate how ostensibly diametrical branches of knowledge, Philosophy and Mathematics, stem from the same principles and axioms. It sparked my interest in Computer Science, as I came to realize that it was quite complementary to what I was learning in class. I was familiarized with the concept of algorithms, computational logic, and realized that programming, for instance, is often misrepresented and misperceived as intimidating, merely because it entails writing seemingly incomprehensible combinations of letters and numbers. Yet, the purpose of creating computer programs or designing software is to utilize logical reasoning in order to create commands which are supposed to help us articulate the world we live in, as well as ourselves – one of the examples being an area known as Algorithmic Game Theory. Albeit ostensibly foreign and often …show more content…
Upon graduating and achieving a 3.84/4.00 GPA (Magna Cum Laude), I seized a job opportunity which consolidated the idea that Computer Science is a “melting pot” of my interests. I have been working as an Operations Business Analyst for a Telecommunications company for 11 months. The freedom to consistently work with big data in SAS and SQL made me feel more confident in my ability to tackle technical problem-solving methods. I had little formal training when I started working, yet I found a way to integrate my background in Economics and Political Science into the problems I was faced with. I spent time outside of work on watching tutorials, reading articles, and practicing coding. Although, I still had a lot to learn about running queries, automating processes, looking through log files to find and comprehend errors, troubleshooting failed jobs, all while following client specifications, I felt comfortable and enthusiastic because I had a strong foundation in analytical thinking. I managed to quickly adjust to the demands of the job without already having an extensive hand-on experience, precisely because the tasks such as observing patterns, questioning them, identifying errors and ways to fix them had all been integral parts of my undergraduate

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