Puck In A Midsummer Night's Dream

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In Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, Puck serves as Shakespeare's voice in the play. He is no regular character, shown by the fact he is the only single person in the play, taking him out of both the fairy and mortal world. Puck not only uses the characters to his liking, but also his audience. Puck is the mischievous sprite who serves Oberon, the Fairy King. Puck or Robin Goodfellow is a sprite or fairy who plays annoying tricks on people or helps them out with their chores (Bhattacharjee 1). This explains why Puck brags to us about all the times he's been a hassle to local villagers by damaging barrels of ale and ruining the batches of butter (Mays 1304). Puck loves to pull a great prank more than anything else. After transforming …show more content…
He whizzes around the globe to fetch Oberon's magic love juice, and when he squeezes it in Lysander's eyes, he begins all the comical mix-ups that rise from the lovers' chase through the woods (Mays 1308 & 1312). After turning the lovers' worlds upside-down, Puck is also one who helps sets things back in place. By giving the lovers the remedy to the love juice, Puck removes the problems they've faced and guarantees the play's conclusion (Mays 1331). This scene being one of the most entertaining scene throughout the play really helps give the audience a look into how Puck is a huge part of the overall plot and development of other characters (Comtois 19-20). Puck also symbolizes the play's theme of "Transformation." He transforms Bottom's head into a donkey’s head, and he also likes shape-shifting himself. During the play, he brags that he often pretends to be a stool and then disappears so that old ladies will land on their "bum" (Mays 1304). He also scares the Mechanicals in the woods after turning their friend into a human-donkey …show more content…
As Puck says, his duty is to "jest to Oberon and make him smile" (Mays 1304). By getting the events that send the lovers into disorder started, Puck also guarantees that the audience has a good time as well. It’s fitting that Puck is the one that closes the play by providing the Epilogue. He is also the only character with the authority to tell the audience that he knows the play is fantastic, like a "dream," and he promises that, if we didn't like the play, he'll soon make it up to us with another one (Hacht 612). In conclusion, Puck is the closest thing the play has to a protagonist. His captivating, mischievous spirit infuses with the atmosphere of the play, and his tricks are responsible for many of the problems that drive the other main plots. Throughout the play, Puck shows that he is graceful but not as sweet as the other fairies. As Oberon’s right-hand man, he is given a certain thickness, which helps him to turn Bottom’s head into the head of an ass for his and the audience’s enjoyment. Puck is overall good-hearted but capable of cruel

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