Importance Of Nature In Frankenstein

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One of the Romantics' most emphasized feature is Nature. It was not only appreciated for its beauty and scenery but for it's ability to help man find his true identity. Nature is also important in order to give the reader a sense of belonging to the physical place. The use of nature in many scholars opinion is because of the industrial revolution, it made a huge shift in the life of people back then from the serene beautiful country side to the modernized cities, In consequence poets used it to become one with nature again because it was where they felt safe and in peace. We will trace this feature throughout the novel Frankenstein and understand how the author, Mary Shelley, used it. Shelley uses nature in the novel to achieve many points. …show more content…
Afetr all the drama of the creature coming to life and how awful it look and Victor fledding the scene then feeling guilty to what he had achived, Victor neede recovery because all the action exerted weakend him. Clerval decided to lift his friend spirit and take him on a tour, where he could be one with nature and restore his human uplifted spirits. Victor describes his feeling on the tour saying "When happy inanimate nature had the power of bestowing on me the most delightful sensations. A serene sky and verdant fields filled me with ecstasy" (Chapter VI). This shows how hopeful Victor is at this point in life. After William's death Victor went back to his native country, while he was walking around near the place his little brother was killed a storm approached and he shouted out loud "William, dear angel! This is thy funeral, this is thy dirge." (Chapter VII) Making it seem as if nature is mourning his brother's death. Victor was too frustrated after William and Justine's death so he starts to take long solitudes in the mountains of Switzerland to refresh his mind and soul. Shelley …show more content…
He gives a detailed description of the overload he felt on his senses when he receives the spark of life saying "A strange multiplicity of sensations seized me, and I saw, felt, heard, and smelt at the same time; and it was indeed a long time before I learned to distinguish between the operations of my various senses."(Chapter

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