Non-Defensive Atmosphere

1125 Words 5 Pages
There must be a check in at the start of the group. This offers a chance to hear from each of the members in the group. It gives a general sense of what’s being brought to the session. This helps create an agenda and pursue a direction. It is here that making the room safe for members is most important to create a non-defensive atmosphere. The use of the scaling technique (on a scale from one to ten…) can help those that are hesitant in participating in the group. It is very important not to get “stuck” with any one member, but to continue with a verification that we can explore it in a future session. Members must talk about any difficulties and hesitations related to the group in order to develop trust. It is important that we listen respectfully …show more content…
All of the leader skills helped in identifying the here-and-now problems of each member. The use of a scaling technique by Marianne to those that do not want to reveal “too much” with an open end question. This made the group members think and respond to how they felt by where they were on the scale. To listen respectfully in a non-defensive way to concerns and not to discount what is said. Acknowledging positive steps when members share their reasons and talk about the matter with others in the group. Problems were well addressed so as not to disrupt the group process, but also in a way to leave a possible revisit to a deeper problem in future sessions. The development of cohesion and trust in the group was helped by the group leader’s trust building techniques. Their way of facilitating the group and identification of problems, helping members clarify and explore problems. They stimulated the members to talk about their views, in a way that did not pressure them to talk. Leaders also helped members support and confront one another to help build trust in the …show more content…
These adults range, in age, from eighteen to fifty five. We are specialized in dealing with readjustment issues for those from former to current conflicts. Some of the services we offer include social economical case management, benefits, advocacy, with individual counseling and family counseling. Our services are offered to both younger and older veterans. Adult veterans cope using skills to survive like they did during war, but also to avoid the effects of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). This additional diagnosis can make it even more difficult to deal with other problems like substance abuse, depression, anxiety and trust issues, which can be heightened due to PTSD. Women veterans are much less seen at our center, but my contact would be limited since women’s groups are conducted by women counselors. Older veterans have much the same concerns as young veterans. Attitudes are usually negative towards mental health for both adults and the elderly veterans. Younger veterans fear the stigma that accompanies any diagnoses with mental health especially PTSD. Older veterans still remember the consequences of showing any type of mental illness with the fear of being institutionalized. The veteran population can be generalized as a separate “group” in which trust is better shared with other veterans. Vet Centers where I work our made up of 70% veteran mental health and outreach

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