Functional Movement Screen

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A screen is a method of appraising common movement patterns. That is to say, we administer a screen to see how our clients complete the most common and basic of movement patterns.
The reason why we – coaches – administer screens is first and foremost to ensure that our clients have the ability to carry out the fundamentals of movements. By ensuring that the fundamentals of movement – our baseline - are there, we minimize the risk of injury (Setanta College, 2017).
One method of assessing the quality of movement of our clients is the Functional Movement Screen (FMS).
The FMS objectively assesses movement through the seven movement patterns and three clearing tests and aims to highlight any weaknesses a client may have displayed in the performance
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When we talk of the fundamentals of fitness we are talking about two things: fundamental motor skills and fundamental physical fitness.
Fundamental motor skills are broken down into three categories; Locomotor, manipulative and Balance (Jaakkola et al, 2014). These are considered to be the building blocks of fitness and are prerequisites for participating in physical activities (Jaakkala et al, 2014).
Locomotor skills are the ability of the individual to move through space. They refer to the individual’s ability to run, gallop, skip, hop, slide and leap (Jaakkola et al., 2014).
Manipulative skills are the individual’s aptitude for manipulating and projecting objects. For example, and individual’s ability to catch, throw, bounce, kick, strike and roll an object (Jaakkola et al., 2014).
Finally, Balance refers to an individual’s ability to maintain postural stability, that is to say, do they possess the ability to keep their body in check whilst traversing its horizontal and vertical axis (Jaakkola et al., 2014).
The second aspect of fundamental fitness is physical fitness. Caspersen et al (1985, pg. 129) defined the aspects of physical fitness as
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The body must display both flexible and adaptable levels of functional joint stability maintenance as levels may vary when in relation to either persons or tasks (Riemann & Lephart, 2002).
Through a collaborative relationship between static and dynamic features, the body is able to maintain functional joint stability. The static side of this relationship is comprised of the ligaments, joint capsules, cartilage friction and the joints geometry, whilst the dynamic side is made up of neuromotor control of the muscles which cross the joint (Riemann & Lephart, 2002). The effectiveness of the dynamic contributions will either be strengthened or inhibited by the physical characteristics of the joint. Namely, rang of motion and muscle strength and endurance (Riemann & Lephart, 2002).
By administering a functional screen, we can gather insight into any faults within the sensorimotor system. We call this an Intrinsic

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