Importance Of Education In The Elizabethan Era

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Elizabethan Era Education Education is an immensely important factor in the daily lives of everyone, especially children. “How children should be educated was and remains a perennial problem at all levels of society” (Wallis and Webb 1). The way students receive their education today is not so different from children that lived in the Elizabethan Era. The different levels of education in that time are similar to the elementary to college level system that is in use to this day. Students in Elizabethan England learned many important skills from their parents before even attending any kind of school. Some children did not attend any advanced schooling but instead they just learned and followed their parent’s career. Most of the children in the …show more content…
Girls in the lower classes did not go to school, instead they would learn from their mothers to be housewives. “Elizabethan girls would be taught obedience to the male members of the family” (Alchin, “Elizabethan Education”). When a girl could get an education from a school, it was still very limited in terms of what she could do (“Education-Class”). The education that any girl could get was not for knowledge but to help them have a good social life. Although very few girls received a proper education in the Elizabethan Era, a family in the upper class could hire a tutor to come to their home and educate their children on many of the same subjects as the kids in school (Alchin, “Elizabethan Education”). Because girls could not get as advanced of an education as boys, they could not go to universities. Since they could not get an advanced education, girls could not become doctors or lawyers. They could however take up the profession of teaching (“Education-Class”). Because of that, many teachers in Elizabethan England were women (Alchin, “Elizabethan …show more content…
Normally, universities were attended by the children of nobles. Once becoming 14 and finishing grammar school, boys went to universities to further their education in specialized subjects (“Education-Class”). “There were many subjects, but the well-known subjects were: The University Faculty of the Arts (Literatures and others too) –The University Faculty of the Liberal Arts (Math, Astronomy, Music, Grammar, [and] Logic) - The University Faculty of Theology - The University Faculty of Law” (“Education-Class”). Some boys extended their education even more after finishing at a university by traveling to different countries

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