Importance Of Diversity Reflection

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By taking women’s studies 101, my diversity requirement for the Community College of Baltimore County, or CCBC, will be fulfilled. In addition to fulfilling a requirement, I am taking this course because learning about different perspectives has the ability to enhance cultural enrichment, augment creativity, and cultivate diversity throughout multiple aspects of life. When studying various viewpoints it is natural to have fears about how new ideas may conflict with your beliefs, values, or previous ideas. I am not directly concerned about possible conflict between old and new ideas, but it has crossed my mind; however, I am very receptive to new ideas and open-minded about life in general. With concern out of the way, hope for the course can …show more content…
The women’s movement is a group of events, focused on feminism, which are broken into three waves. Wave one occurred between 1848 and 1920; two goals of this movement were to achieve suffrage and to address women’s right to property (Shaw & Lee 12). A crucial event of the first wave was the Seneca Falls convention of 1848. The Seneca Falls convention led to a piece of writing known as the “Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions,” which was primarily written by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Stanton’s writing included a list of grievances that included suffrage and women’s right to property; these grievances were given the utmost importance at the convention (Stanton, Anthony, and Cage). Suffrage, or the right to vote, was something women did not possess; however, they still had to live in a society governed by a body they had no say on. Additionally, women had no right to property- even if they earned it. Everything a woman earned belonged to her husband. Women were often considered property and therefore belonged to their husbands. It took time, but the Seneca Falls convention was successful in achieving suffrage- the right to vote was achieved in 1920. After suffrage was achieved, the women’s movement experienced a period of stagnation and the second wave did not occur until 1964. The second wave of this movement occurred between 1964 and 1980; it addressed …show more content…
The second wave movement resulted in multiple legal changes, including the formation of organizations and passage of laws. The Equal Pay Act of 1963 was passed in order for women to earn equal pay for equal work: this means that if a woman does the same job as a man, they should theoretically be paid the same amount. In addition to the Equal Pay Act, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, or EEOC, was formed in 1965. The goal of the EEOC was to enforce antidiscrimination laws. Striving for equal employment was

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