Pain Of Childbirth

872 Words 4 Pages
It is common for different nations to perceive mental processes differently from each other, but the universal, psychological process of pain unifies cultures across the globe. The specific pain of childbirth is a common and expected understanding amongst the women of the world and is defined by her cultural and educational background. Her levels of distress measured verbally or nonverbally, reach out to all mothers as they too have experienced the same pain. The perception of pain and women’s reaction to giving birth gives the purpose to the study titled, “Cultural and Educational Influences on Pain Of Childbirth”, conducted by Matisyohu Weisenberg and Zahava Caspi in the hopes of discovering a better understanding on dealing with laboring …show more content…
Their ages ranged from a youthful nineteen mother delivering her first child to a mature thirty-eight year old woman. Chosen from a major hospital in Israel, the participants were divided into two groups based on familial origin and education levels. One of the classifications was defined as the Western group; thirty of the eighty-three women originating from English speaking countries such as the United States or Europe, while the others had a family line that derived from Middle Eastern countries such as North Africa or Asia. The groups were then further divided amongst each other in regards to levels of education. Those who received twelve years or more of high education, thirty-eight out of the total eighty-three, were differentiated from those who received less than that. In regards to education, only eighteen of the Middle Eastern group received higher education, while twenty of the thirty Western women had high …show more content…
Women of the Middle Eastern group rated the level of pain pointedly higher than Western women and women of lower education in general, regardless of cultural background, marked the level of pain higher than women of high education. In comparison, the high educational women from both cultural groups marked similar results on the scale of pain. However, unlike the culture group of Western women, the results within the party of Middle Eastern women indicated a difference between low and high education, the lower group expressing a higher pain rating. In terms of pain behavior, a significant difference was recorded between Middle Eastern women in comparison to the Western women as well as within its own educational group. Middle Eastern women reacted stronger in reaction to pain, especially those who came from a lower educational background. Regardless of the amount of education received, western women behaved the same across the

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