Importance Of Creativity In Schools

4429 Words 18 Pages
Register to read the introduction… Schools should therefore promote thinking that is flexible, the ability to adapt, and risk-taking in the face of an uncertain future. Unlike facts and knowledge, that can become obsolete with time, these skills, intricately linked to creativity, will most likely continue to be important throughout one’s lifetime. What I have often witnessed in schools is teachers’ lack of appreciation of, stemming from a lack of knowledge about such skills. It is no wonder that there are still several misconceptions about the role of creativity in education. Writing about teachers, Prentice (2000) states that there is a need to make explicit the range of skills, knowledge and understanding required to ground ideas about creativity in educational practice. (Prentice, 2000: …show more content…
When teaching for creativity the teacher facilitates knowledge rather than presents it for the learner to take it all in passively: Rather than providing the student with ready-made knowledge, the teacher must guide and encourage students attentively in order to elicit their response and help them find fulfilment in what they do. (Q: M, 064, 20-29, State Secondary). Creativity should be fostered across the board. Its purpose is to give pupils the tools to be able to express themselves in different ways. (Q: F, 112, 30-39, State …show more content…
Achievement for a creative person is not money or exams (M, 114, 50-59, State Primary). offers him a high level of intrinsic satisfaction even when faced by opposition/ discouragement by others, (M, 189, 30-39 Post Secondary teacher). On the other hand, Eisenberger and Armeli (1997)11 demonstrate how external rewards can help to foster creativity. They show that extrinsic rewards lead to lasting improvements even in a creative area such as music when children are rewarded for specific ‘creative’ activities such as integrating unexpected elements or producing alternative possibilities. From my experience, different strategies work with different learners and the strategy adopted needs to seen in the context within which it is applied. An extrinsic reward could be seen by learners as a tangible positive reward for their achievement. The danger, however, is that learners become too dependent on the extrinsic

Related Documents