Cognitive Development

Improved Essays
Cognitive Development in Educational Psychology
Individuals have the ability to think and consider their own reasoning and in this way it is the concentration of psychological improvement. (Flavell, Miller & Miller, 1993, p.3) Moreover, it researches on how individuals can get information and how this is impacted by the way of life they live in and the way of learning gained. (Jordan, E. & Porath, M., 2006) On the other hand, according to Piaget, intellectual improvement depends to some level of development of the brain. Piaget suggested that major physiological changes happen when children are around two years of age, again when they are six or seven, and again around adolescence, and that these changes permit the improvement of progressively
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Nevertheless, there are different strategies that ought to provide benefits to a broad range of students. The first approach is to minimize the potentially distracting stimuli because many students with learning disabilities are easily distracted. For instance, the classroom setting should be fairly quiet during seatwork time. (Jordan, E. & Porath, M., 2006) Second, analyzing students’ errors for clues about their learning difficulties because most students with this inadequacy make mistakes in responding to question, problems and other scholarly procedure is another process. Accordingly, as opposed to thinking about specific reactions simply as being wrong, we can look closely at errors for pieces of information about specific troubles students are having in cognitive development. (Lerner, 1985) Lastly, to show learning and memory strategies is one great method of building up the intellectual aspect of an individual. They can be educated of mental instructions where it can help them follow the appropriate steps of a task. (Turnbull et. al., 1999) Besides, there is a technique called ‘mnemonics’ or ‘memory tricks’ to help them learn new data. (Mastropieri & Scruggs, 1992) These methods are of significant value concerning the standard of cognitive development towards students with learning disabilities since they demonstrate how a

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