Bowlby's Attachment Theory

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Attachment can be described as the emotional bond that connects one person to another person. According to John Bowlby (1969) explained that it is a “lasting psychological connectedness between human beings”. Basically, attachment theory can be described on how a child interacts with the adults caring for him or her. If a child has a strong attachment, this means that the child can be confident that the caregiver or the adult will respond to the child's needs, an example would be if a child is hungry, frightened or tired. The caregiver will respond to meet the child needs, comfort or reassurance. This paper discusses how attachments have an important role in the relationship between the child, caregiver and child’s development. It also analyses …show more content…
Bowbly suggested that attachment evolved as an aid to survival. If this is accurate then attachment and the caregiver behaviour should be universal, in all cultures, despite differences in the child upbringing and environment. There are proof to support this (Tronick et al). The weakness reflects the ideal that attachment behaviour has evolved to promote a child's development has a good validity, but evolutionary ideas are very difficult to test, which means that it could be difficult to prove or disprove any findings. Bowlby’s theory focuses on the role of the mother. There is evidence that in two parent’s families, the equality of attachment of the father can also have a big effect on the child’s behaviour and development (Grossman*Grossman, 1991) NEED ONE MORE STRENGHT AND …show more content…
This stage may be accompanied by positive or negative experiences. If there is a positive relationship with the caregiver and the child, which indicate that the child will have a good development skill. But if the relationship between the child and caregiver is negative, it might lead to a deteriorated development skill of the child. Human development is a broad and very complex topic, it is very important to understand different stages of child’s development and their specific characteristics. Social work and professional can intervene if there is a difficult or negative relationship between the child and caregiver; access the families’ situations, environment, the gender of the child, attitude of the child and caregiver. John Bowlby researched into relationship development between the child and caregiver is a progressive homeostatic function that produces four characteristics of attachment. Mary Ainsworth believed in homeostatic systems, but research furthermore into attachment. By splitting the attachment theory into three different stages: secure, avoidant and resistant. Any failure of this initial attachment and development structure can affect a child’s long-term

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