Philippines Assimilation

Decent Essays
What is the importance of assimilation and amalgamation in the US?
The objective basis for assimilation is the immigrants’ integration into the political economy and social structures of their adopted country. Filipinos were required to participate in the American social-economic system to survive in a new economy. The second process deals with “social reproduction” of the Filipino national minority in Hawaii. In 1978, the U.S assimilation was polarized along racial lines on the assimilation of “non-white” immigrants. The United States called ”non-white” immigrants in Hawaii since of there were many ethnicity, which eventually presents as an “imperfect” assimilation into the nationality (Alegado, 1991).
Today in America we are a diverse
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The ILWU won the fight against a narrow and sectarian racial unionism. However, the HSPA imported 6,00 more Filipinos’ from the Philippines to break the strike., Between 1946-1958 each planation workers went on strike, which lasted between four to ten months. After the strike, Filipinos were under the ILWU and started to increase their alcohol intake (Alegado, 1991). When the ILWU witness the Filipinos becoming an alcoholic, they set up a sophisticated system that organized social and recreational activities to keep the Filipinos and other racial division into a greater solidarity union (Alegado, 1991). With the help of ILWU Filipinos’ were able to emerge their ability and played a big role in becoming members of the Democratic Party, which led them to stay in …show more content…
The Filipino workers moved into an urban center to find jobs and become a residence. Since the plantation economy decreased the Filipinos were no longer isolated in the planation enclave. The Filipino immigrant children were able to attend school and were able to further their education. Eventually, the children along their parents were assimilated into “local” category in the American culture. Since the Filipinos moved into the urban community they earned more money by working at hotels and other tours location in Hawaii. The Filipino planation workers were free to move off the island and move wherever they wanted to go after being part of United

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