Importance Of Architecture

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My earliest memory of ever having an interest in architecture was when I was three years old playing with the Lego Duplo set my parents had bought me. I wanted my design for my Barbie’s house to be something spectacular that no other Barbie had. I remember that passion, that passion that I still have today for architecture. One of the reasons I chose architecture as my major over everything else is because I love how I have the capability to design structures that can move people both physically and emotionally. Being able to put so much sensation into an inanimate object is something that renders me speechless every time. Over the years my appetite for architecture slowly developed and it wasn’t until my third year in college that it hit me. …show more content…
In order to meet my expectations, I need to be more involved and experienced in the design process. To be able to construct small models based on my ideas was fairly simple but that taught me to think in terms of where my design was going and how it could be executed in a successful manner. In this case, I was able to render nature but I lost the key elements from my original design that really evoked the emotion I wanted in response to my design. This semester I’m VP of ARCS, an architecture club at CCSF. We didn’t start off running and it took us a little while to get on our feet, but after coexisting with the interior design club, we really got things moving. By being able to design spaces, like this tearoom we are currently working on, I am getting excellent experience in teamwork and collaborating in the design process. We discuss how certain aspects of our designs evoke emotion and what we want as a response from our designs. In our current design, we are looking towards two main feelings, relaxed and playful. We are achieving these by manipulating our space to convey relaxation and playfulness in openings and curves of our design. *vague af* …show more content…
I had never worn the hijab before and decided that I would begin this new spiritual journey when I was in The Holy Land. As it was my first day back, I was already very nervous because I had missed the first three days of school and I didn’t want this to effect the school year. Walking to my first class to pick up a chemistry book two boys began laughing quite loudly when I head them direct their conversation towards me and bellow, “What’s she got under that scarf? I bet it’s a bomb! I bet that she’s got one strapped to her chest too!” I couldn’t believe what I was hearing and in fact I was too mortified to even look up at the boys so I continued to my class while my hands shook uncontrollably from the pure disbelief of what just happened. Born and raised in the United States and I was discriminated against all because of the cloth on my head. Even though I was severely angered and upset from this event for months to follow, I didn’t let that stop me from embracing the experience and making the best out of it. In the weeks that followed, I joined a club called Panel of Young Americans. What this club aided me with was to stand up for myself and my beliefs, increase my confidence, advance my leadership abilities, and help children who have also been bullied and discriminated against to stand up for themselves and let them know its

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