Mental Disorders: The Cause Of Mental Illness

1945 Words 8 Pages
Michelle Obama once said, “At the root of this dilemma is the way we view mental health in this country. Whether an illness affects your heart, your leg or your brain, it’s still an illness, and there should be no distinction”. Although people don’t want to admit it, mental illness is very common yet a great deal of stigma is attached to it. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, approximately 1 in 5 adults in the U.S, that roughly 4.8 million or 18.5%, experience mental illness in a given year. In the same statistic, they said that approximately 1 in 25 adults in the U.S, roughly 10 million or 4.2%, experiences a serious mental illness in a given year that significantly interferes with or limits one or more major life activities. …show more content…
Psychoneuroses incorporates the milder anomalies of the psychological processes driven by daily conflicts, frustrations, and other emotional stresses. These emotions can debilitate the person hindering them from performing functions of their daily life. Obsessive-compulsive disorders are described by the powerful passage of undesirable thoughts, considerations, or emotions into awareness or by the need to more than once perform formal activities that the sufferer sees as superfluous or unjustifiable. Somatoform disorders, which incorporate the alleged crazy, or transformation, depressions, show themselves in physical manifestations like visual impairment, loss of motion, or deafness that are not brought on by the natural ailment. Anxiety disorders are defined as nervousness as the primary component, showing itself either in generally short, intense tension assaults or in a ceaseless feeling of anonymous fear. A phobia is a nervousness issue as well and is spoken to by wrong fears that are activated by particular circumstances or items. Some regular objects …show more content…
My anxiety disorder started showing signs when I was in the 4th grade. My family life was very unstable, complex and sometimes abusive. At the time, I was too young to know what anxiety or panic attacks were. I would be in certain situations and get a rush of adrenaline. My hands would become sweaty and tingly, my heart would begin to race, I would start to feel extremely nauseous, and possibly lose control of my bowels. When I felt like this I would run to the bathroom, and stay in there for hours. My parents thought I was acting out for attention and never really looked into it. When I was 18 years old, I went to a psychiatrist and after many test and examinations, she concluded that I had an anxiety disorder. She prescribed me Xanax and sent me on my way with a few breathing techniques. The Xanax made me feel even more anxious so I discontinued using them. I realized that the only way I was going to overcome my disorder was to live my life in a more peaceful way. I moved to another state and removed people from my life that caused me this immense stress. I have to admit that sometimes I would feel this way at work. My body thought I was in a fight or flight situation, but I was unable to unleash these feelings in a professional way. Sometimes I would say that I needed to go home because I was having a bad stomach ache and they would excuse me from the day. I have a soft spot for those dealing with mental illness,

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