Indian Removal Act

Superior Essays
According to Stewart (2007), on May 28th 1830, the United States of America passed the Indian removal act, after heated debates in congress, which saw the senate vote as 28 to 19 for the bill. The House of Representatives endorsed it by 101 to 97 votes. President Andrew Jackson then signed it into law. The Indian Removal Act was a law that was passed to allow the president to negotiate with the Indian tribes occupying the Southern states on their removal: and subsequent settlement on the federal territory located to the west of the Mississippi River, so that Native Americans could occupy their homeland. The passing of the law saw many American-Indian tribes reluctantly relocate to the west of Mississippi River, in what was popularly known …show more content…
The American is portrayed to have embraced modernity unlike the savage Indians who have been living in huge tracts of forest vegetation. The Native American, as per the president’s speech, is a civilized Christian human being, and is supreme above any other race in the land. The American is supposed to have the first focus and his rights should come above those of anyone else because it is their land. The Native has also suffered for long trying to move into other areas, and now was time to stay in their land. On the other hand, the president brings out the Americans as merciful and considerate. He claims that by moving the Indian population into certain states, their extinction would be averted as well as annihilation. As much as they were solely focused on occupying their land for the sake of development, they were safeguarding the best interests of the Indian community. However, there was a sense of greed from the Native American who was keen on acquiring land in the South, which did not belong to him initially. The American-European is depicted mostly with the many missionaries, who are against the law being enacted. They are considerate religious people who care about the emotional effects of having to leave …show more content…
He comes out as a staunch nationalist by calling for the movement of Indians into a place where they could associate themselves with each other and get to practice their beliefs, as well as protecting the American interest by strengthening the numbers of Natives in states to create a national outlook. The president is very attached with his country and places its interest at heart. In regards to industrial revolution, placing Native Americans in the south enhanced the development of industries, agriculture and mining among others. This is what facilitated the growth of cities and the economy, consequently. Colonialism is also evident from the president’s speech. The Indian community have no option but ti adhere to what the master has to say, only that it is not being done by force. The congress in this case is used to colonize the Indian community in the area (Stephanson,

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Just like Jackson, the southern states were greedy for land expansion. They wanted the Indian territories and would do whatever it took to get them. Many of these white settlers in the southern states viewed the Native American peoples as a “savage” group that had no chance of being civilized. If the people had no respect or intent of compromise with the Indians, it was quite apparent that the state officials would act in the same manner. With Georgia being the guiding leader, several of the southern states passed laws that restricted the authority and rights of the Indian nations over their own territories.…

    • 1297 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Indian Culture

    • 874 Words
    • 4 Pages

    It was appalling to see a nation founded on liberty to act in such phony behavior. In the end, the U.S. excelled in obtaining western land, but failed in the morality issues with the natives. The balance between continental expansion and coexisting with the natives largely favored the whites. The proof was shown in the population of the natives which plundered downwards along with the reduction of their lands. The settlement of the west left natives “psychologically demoralized, culturally endangered,…

    • 874 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    America thought that the Navajos would make a peace treaty binding all Navajos, but that was not the case. The Navajos were considered independent and if another province made a treaty, they would ignore it and continue to makes raids. The United States did not take this very well because if one Navajo committed a crime then the U.S. believed that all Navajos should be punished. The Americans totally took away the land that was rightfully theirs, but more importantly they took away their pride. "The Navajos fled before them, looking down from the heights above while there hohrahns went up in flames.…

    • 2132 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The white’s a racist attitude towards the Native Americans resembled the outlook toward the Hispanic race. The concept granted no Native American or nonwhite authority to any permanent possession of the lands in North America. With this in mind, Americans sought the expropriation of Indian Lands for their own interest and benefits. In addition, it also demonstrated the long standing and surreal sense of a racial component in the “chosen people”. Many on the settlers alleged that God himself established the American mission to advance and take control over the heathens or foreigners.…

    • 1328 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Therefore, lead Congress to pass the Wade-Davis Bill in July 1864, the bill allow the the president to appoint a provisional governor for states that have rejoin the United States, but was more in depth and consequences than Lincoln’s ten-percent Plan. The Wade-Davis Bill did not last long it was quickly vetoed by Lincoln. Lincoln was not liked by most White Southerners because of the Emancipation. While watching a play at the Ford’s Theater in Washington April 14, 1865, Lincoln was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth. Booth was an advocate of the Southern cause.…

    • 1181 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Indian Removal Act, signed into laws by Andrew Jackson and congress in 1830 ratified an agreement to move all Native tribes west of the Mississippi in exchange for the lands they currently held. The exchange that Andrew Jackson had proposed in December of 1829 was a voluntary transfer, one that must be ratified by both parties and could not forced upon the Cherokee. However, Jackson made it clear that any resistance to the laws would be met with force. Other tribes signed treaties with the US government some time after the ratification of the Indian Removal Act; the Cherokee resisted their removal by legal means. They argued that the anti-Cherokee laws that Georgia had enacted sometime after gold was found on Cherokee land were unconstitutional and won their case in 1832.…

    • 1212 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Myth of the Vanishing Indian has served a vital function in U.S. history. The removal of the Cherokees indeed illustrates the pervasiveness of this myth. After the arrival of the Europeans to the Americas, the indigenous population dwindled significantly. This myth attempts to explain this phenomena by claiming that the disappearance of Native Americans after their contact with the European settlers was inevitable unless they assimilate because they were “culturally and genetically weaker”. Essentially, the myth was formulated by the white people to justify taking Native American land because they were interested in expanding the United States.…

    • 1699 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Dbq Indian Removal Act

    • 1355 Words
    • 5 Pages

    This Act stated that members of certain Native American tribes would have to move from the southern land they had lived on for decades to new western land, or lose most of their rights and their land. This was a very controversial act, and both supporters and opponents of the act argued viciously for their preferred outcome. The Indian Removal Act was a bad political move because it was both unconstitutional and illegal, but was enforced regardless. Though it was meant to protect Native Americans from the threat of angry citizens, what it really did was remove many tribes from their land so that US citizens could expand into it. Many tribes rightfully protested this, and the Cherokee tribe sued the government.…

    • 1355 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    American History Assignment # 5 Indian Removal Act What was Jackson’s view on Native Americans? What was the impact of the Indian Removal Act? Jackson before and during his presidency despised the Native Americans. He felt they should not be independent and that they could present a security issue for the United States, since Europe during that time period was trying to develop a bond with the various tribes to “prevent expansion” in the United States. Jackson believed and supported the white settlers in having the Indians, especially those located in the southeast part of the United States removed from the land they occupied, if the settlers wanted to settle on that section of land.…

    • 444 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Improved Essays

    He did not care for the Indians because he was responsible for the uprise of shady treaties against the Indians for his own convenience (William Henry). In the article, Tecumseh states,”...the only way to get rid of this evil, is for the red people to unite in claiming a common and equal right in the land,” (44-48). In this fragment, Tecumseh is attempting to become allies with the Americans. He wants to persuade the president into trusting them in order to regain their territory. The author uses the rhetorical device, causal relationships in order to show the president that if they receive suitable land, they will halt all brutality.…

    • 719 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays