Imperialism In The Industrial Revolution

710 Words 3 Pages
Imperialism refers to the political and economic control of an area or country. For this to occur, a stronger country would take over the weaker country in order to squeeze their assets dry. This superior power would take the natural resources the other countries possess and use them for their own gain. As a result, it would lead to the complete ignorance of the weaker country’s culture and government. Because of the industrial revolution, many nations became imperialistic to fulfill their needs. Industrialization increased the industrial countries need to control the supply line of raw materials of other countries for production. Not only that, imperialism increased due to the rivalry and power struggle between rising industrial countries, …show more content…
Finally, imperialism increased because many producers were willing to create new markets for their manufactured goods in these newly acquired regions. In short, the necessity of imperialism was strengthened because the industrial revolution led to the need of raw materials for production and the opening of new markets for these newly produced goods. During the 19th century, industrialization has spread from England to other countries around Europe, the United States, and Japan, changing their ways of life considerably. Due to the industrial revolution, the military strength of these countries increased at an alarming pace. As mentioned by Hilaire Belloc, “Whatever happens we have got The Maxim gun and they have not” (Strayer, 885), demonstrating the overwhelming differences between England and countries that aren’t industrialized. With this power, the act of securing resources that isn’t available in the industrialized country is simply solved by securing it through force. More raw materials were …show more content…
By creating colonial monopolies, nations would be able to control future resources without any debate. Before the 1880’s, there was very little control in Africa. This changed drastically as the European nations began searching for resources. In the Berlin Conference, the rules and groundwork for “The Scramble of Africa” was decided and resulted in the decision that a single European country cannot control Africa. France conquered the majority of Africa, including the Sahara Desert, making its empire as big as the United States. The British gained control of diamond and gold mines in southern Africa, establishing their own government in the region. Another instance of a competition over land disputes was the spheres of influence over China. Due to the influence of the Boxer Rebellion, the doors to China were thrown wide open as diplomats from Britain, France, Germany, Russia, and Japan came flooding in, establishing their spheres of influence. After gaining massive profits, even the United States entered the fray, fearing they would be excluded from Chinese trade. This led to the creation of the Open Door Policy which stated that all nations should have equal trading rights with China, despite the spheres of influences that govern the nation. Meanwhile, as the production of manufactured goods continue to grow, a need for new markets

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