Imperialism In Ride Haggard's She By Madhudaya Sinha

794 Words 4 Pages
Madhudaya Sinha’s essay “Triangular Erotics: The Politics of Masculinity, Imperialism and Big-Game Hunting in Ride Haggard’s ‘She’”, evaluates the role of human evolution and imperialism throughout time. Most importantly, Sinha argues the importance of manhood’s representation through animals, the natural world, and Mother Nature. Although masculinity is compared to ‘“the other one’” (Sinha, 29) in both the essay and the original text, She; without a female presence, the power of human evolution and imperialism would not exist. The author is able to show femininity in the male authority figures and how they have been able to rule over an empire because of their ability to lead. Sinha likes to evaluate the female roles in the text as an insight …show more content…
The first female leader mentioned in She is Ayesha whom is able to convince Holly of being knowledgeable on the natural world. Nature is being contrasted with the supernatural world, which Ayesha believes cannot be controlled by human forces. Sinha argues only “imperial masculine figures” (Sinha, 31) have the ability to control the natural world. The texts itself argues the exact opposite. She revolves around the idea of female figures being able to control the world around them. For example, Haggard uses a large section of the text to describe how “it is thy beauty that makes [them] fear” (Haggard, 132) the Queen, Hiya. Hiya is able to control the pigs, baboons, and lions that are described as “fight[ing] like very men” (Haggard, 133) until Hiya comes to save them, also referred to as “the evil doers” (Haggard, 133). The queen is able to establish dominance while things are chaotic. Sinha’s theory does accept the importance of females in his essay, however, his claim only leaves room for men to be leaders, as opposed to both men and women. Sinha later contradicts his initial claim, as he recognizes Leo and Holly were actually trying to understand why women were so powerful in their …show more content…
It is shown that men would hunt animals as a way to strengthen their allegiance to manhood; whereas women joined the hunting sport as a form of entertainment and to prove their power over an empire. Specifically, Ayesha is notably viewed as a god-like figure that rivals the Greek and Roman gods, Artemis and Diana (Sinha, 40). Sinha uses these gods as contrasting figures to Ayesha because of the respect they have received not only in ancient Greek and Roman history, but throughout history in its entirety. Not only were they rulers of empires, but they were able to set high standards for “female authority” (Sinha, 40). Through examples of hunting and ancient mythology, Sinha is able to validate Haggard’s ideas from

Related Documents