Colonial Immigrants In The 18th Century

800 Words 4 Pages
Modern Americans take pride in certain unalienable human rights as well as the ability to self-govern. The guiding principles of the United States would not be present without the efforts of colonial immigrants in the 18th century. While the colonies were originally created as means to support British mercantilism, over time the inhabitants of these colonies began to develop their own sense of nationality and ideas about how a governing body should run. After the French and Indian War, British parliament heightened control over the colonies, which clashed with the independent colonial operations across the Atlantic. While parliament’s original intent for legislation was to help pay the war debt, the increased resistance from the colonies created …show more content…
In Great Britain, the British already paid an extraordinary amount in taxes compared to their colonial equivalents. Parliament decided it was fair to ask the colonists to pay for a slightly larger chunk of the debt, since they reaped most of the benefits of the war. Even with the addition of the new taxes, colonists still paid less than the civilians of Great Britain. Because of the attitudes from the colonies concerning the new taxes, many British residents believed that the colonists were acting entitled. The colonists’ apparent disrespect for the authority of Parliament later initiated different types of …show more content…
Both sides of the dispute felt equally offended by the damage the other had inflicted. Colonists had been accustomed to ruling themselves and working in independent industries. From the American purview, the British had no business dealing in new world affairs. However, Britain’s founding objective for the colonies was to have them serve as outposts for imperial mercantilism. With this mindset, the British felt thoroughly displeased with the lack of respect shown by colonists. Because both sides were rooted in their beliefs as to who was wrong, colonists decided to act by issuing the Declaration of Independence and igniting the American Revolution. The impact of the American Revolution extends far beyond what the original colonists may have thought. The ideals of the new nation prospered into a global superpower that sets the precedence for human rights and democracy. However, colonists are not the only group to receive credit for the ideological breakthrough of the revolution. The constant pressure from British parliament and the barrage of legislation led the colonists toward new beginnings. In Britain’s effort to reign in the colonies, parliament’s overbearing fixation resulted in an epic feud that awakened the new

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